Amanda Burstein

Amanda Burstein has over fifteen years of experience in project and program management, with eight years in the public safety sector before beginning her work as a Senior Program Manager with the National Police Foundation in 2019. Ms. Burstein previously served as a Program Manager at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), overseeing national training and technical assistance programs such as the Alzheimer’s Initiatives, Officer Safety and Wellness programs, and the Research Center. Working closely with all levels of government, law enforcement and strategic partners, she facilitated the development of tools and resources to further enhance public safety initiatives. She has participated in the National Officer Safety and Wellness Working Group and the CDC’s National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s Public Sector Working Group, and she was staff liaison to IACP’s Research Advisory Committee, SafeShield Committee (officer safety), and Crime Prevention Committee. She also oversaw entrepreneurial efforts within IACP’s portfolio of management studies and promotional testing products. She acted as guest editor for Police Chief Magazine for several years, providing subject matter review to monthly columns and several whole issues.

Prior to IACP, Amanda worked for several nonprofits including The National Mentoring Partnership, Volunteers of America, and the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, working in various marketing, fundraising, and programmatic roles.

Amanda received a B.A. in Clinical Psychology from Tufts University with minors in Community Health (Public Health) and Child Development and has a Project Management Professional Certification from the Project Management Institute. She will be starting a Master’s in Public Administration at George Mason University in Fall of 2019.

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Jane Dorsey

Jane Dorsey is the grants and contracts manager at the Police Foundation. Ms. Dorsey was the office manager at Prudent Energy Corporation for the past four years. Prior to that, she has more than 17 years of non-profit experience with The Stimson Center. Her work encompassed a broad range from office management, financial associate, grants and contracts management, and desktop publishing. Ms. Dorsey received her Bachelor of Arts in visual communications from the George Washington University.


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Tamara Martin

Tamara Martin joined the National Police Foundation in May 2020. Tamara previously worked at the University of Maryland, where she directed the Membership and Marketing department and led a complete department revamp and eCRM conversion. She achieved this while simultaneously executing award-winning revenue generating campaigns. She has over 15 years of non-profit management expertise, both nationally and internationally, having worked in and/or overseen development, events, business development, member services and communications functions in a variety of large and small organizations.

As a former Director of Development and Communications and Director of Fundraising and Events, she was very successful in donor development strategies. She has worked directly with individual, corporate and major gift donors throughout her career. She also trained numerous industry professionals on her recruitment, retention and growth best practices, and managed 250 workplace giving corporate accounts while helping organizations to grow in their business development efforts. She is a strong advocate for data and analysis-driven efforts and performance management, including return on investment (ROI) analysis.

Tamara has raised nearly $20 million in funding over her career thus far. She also brings a wealth of knowledge in outreach and engagement, donor acquisition, and innovative campaign execution. Tamara has received numerous awards and recognition from the Virginia Public Relations Society, including Capital Merit Awards and an Award of Excellence.

Tamara is no stranger to law enforcement and is committed to the mission of NPF, as her mother has served her community for the past 25 years as a decorated sergeant in a local police agency.


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Frank Straub, Ph.D.

A 30-year veteran of law enforcement, Dr. Frank Straub currently serves as the Director of the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies at the Police Foundation, where he works on Critical Incident Reviews including the San Bernardino terrorist attack–and the resulting report Bringing Calm to Chaos–and the Orlando Pulse shooting (in progress). Dr. Straub last served as the Chief of the Spokane, Washington, Police Department, where he received national recognition for the major reforms, community policing programs he implemented and significant crime reductions achieved during his tenure. In Spokane, Dr. Straub mandated that all members of the department receive 40-hours of crisis intervention training, and he created a team of officers who received over 100 hours of specialized mental health training. As Director of Public Safety for the City of Indianapolis, Dr. Straub collaborated with Eskanazi Medical Center’s Prescription for Hope Program, assigning a team of police officers to the program, which focused on reducing youth violence and retaliation through hospital-based interventions. During his tenure, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department reduced homicides to the lowest level in 20 years. Dr. Straub has also served as the Public Safety Commissioner for the City of White Plains, New York where his department reduced serious crime by 40%. He established the first police-community mental health response team in Westchester County to proactively assist persons challenged by mental illness, homelessness and domestic violence. Dr. Straub previously served as the Deputy Commissioner of Training for the New York City Police Department; and as a federal agent. He holds a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice, from the City University of New York’s Graduate Center, an M.A. in Forensic Psychology from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and a B.A. in Psychology from St. John’s University. He co-authored a book on performance-based police management and published several articles regarding community policing, police reform, and jail management.


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Dr. Travis Taniguchi

Dr. Travis Taniguchi joined the National Police Foundation as Director of Research in May 2020. He has over 10 years of research experience and has lead projects for the National Institute of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office for Community Policing Services, and Office for the Victims of Crime. His research focuses on testing policies and strategies through field randomized experiments with law enforcement agencies. Dr. Taniguchi has recently completed projects exploring strategies for disrupting near repeat patterns of residential burglary and methods law enforcement agencies can use to prioritize warrant service. He has also run numerous large-scale survey data collections involving law enforcement agencies.

Prior to joining the National Police Foundation, Dr. Taniguchi served as a Research Criminologist at RTI International and Police Criminologist for the Redlands (California) Police Department. He has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Chaminade University of Honolulu and a master’s and PhD in Criminal Justice from Temple University.


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Virgil Young, Jr.

Mr. Young currently serves as the Interim Director of International Programs at the Police Foundation. He assists in managing a multi-year US State Department Grant to increase the number of Mexican criminal justice agencies that are accredited through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA).

After graduating from college, Mr. Young served as a US Marine infantry officer before joining the FBI as a Special Agent to begin his law enforcement career. From 1970 to 1980, he was assigned to the FBI’s Detroit, San Francisco, and New York City Field Offices. In the New York City Field Office, he worked primarily organized crime investigations and then served as a squad supervisor for two years. After being transferred to FBI Headquarters (FBIHQ) in Washington, DC in 1980, he served in supervisory and lower management positions in the Criminal Investigative Division and the Inspection Division. In 1987, he was named the Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the Richmond, VA Field Office, which covers three-fourths of Virginia. In 1990, Mr. Young was transferred back to FBIHQ as a member of the FBI’s Senior Executive Service. For the next 3 years, he served as the chief of various sections in the Identification Division and the Criminal Justice Information Services Division. Throughout that period, he coordinated FBI activities with local, state, and federal criminal justice agency representatives on various national criminal justice advisory boards. During one assignment, he directed a section charged with responsibility for development of the National Crime Information Center 2000 project, the National Fingerprint File of the Interstate Identification Index, and the Felon Identification in Firearms Sales Program, among others. In 1994, Mr. Young was named the Special Agent in Charge of the FBI’s Knoxville Field Office, whose territory covers the eastern half of Tennessee, and remained in that position until his retirement in 1998. After retiring from the FBI, Mr. Young began consulting on security and law enforcement matters, which has taken him all over the US and to several foreign countries.

Mr. Young became a contract assessor for CALEA in 1998 and was later approved as a team leader. As a contract CALEA Assessment Team Leader, he led assessments of more than 50 law enforcement agencies, public safety communications centers, and public safety training academies throughout the US as well as in Canada, Mexico and Barbados. He has led 12 CALEA assessments of Mexican agencies. He is also active with the Law Enforcement Accreditation Coalition of Tennessee (LEACT) and has used LEACT protocols to conduct more than 40 mock assessments, including 14 mock assessments in Mexico.

Before beginning his law enforcement career, Mr. Young earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Kansas. During his FBI career, he graduated from the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, CA; the Federal Executive Institute in Charlottesville, VA; and the FBI’s Executive Development Institute at the FBI Academy. He also earned a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice Studies from Long Island University.


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Jennifer Zeunik

Ms. Zeunik provides oversight, leadership, contract/grant, staff and financial management, and product development and quality control for the National Police Foundation’s portfolio of state and local law enforcement projects. Ms. Zeunik has twenty years of public sector and nonprofit project management experience, working closely with all levels of government on policing issues focusing on finding data-driven, evidence-based solutions to policing challenges. She has extensive technical and managerial experience in the field of law enforcement operations and community policing and has overseen several critical incident reviews—including the police response to the Pulse Nightclub Shooting in Orlando (FL) and the terrorist attack in San Benardino (CA) and reviews of police response to protests and demonstrations in Portland (OR), Charlotte (NC) and Minneapolis (MN). In previous roles, Ms. Zeunik served as the Vice President of Programs for the Atlanta Police Foundation, and project manager with the International Association of Chiefs of Police where she managed a variety programs funded through a diverse array of sources including federal grants, private funding, and state and municipal contracts. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and Criminology from Florida State University and a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Georgia, School of Public and International Affairs.


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