Smartphones for Law Enforcement

The Police Foundation and the Redlands Police Department have partnered to develop, implement, and evaluate the deployment of iPhones and custom apps. The Redlands Police Department deploys over 100 iPhones and 75 iPads to its sworn, civilian, and volunteer staff. The department has been featured by Apple as an example of innovative use of the technology in an enterprise environment.

Field Interview (FI)

The FI app allows users to conduct field interviews (FI) directly on their iPhone. These FIs are then directly uploaded to the agency’s records management system.

Creating actionable intelligence information requires a two-way flow of data; users should be able to retrieve data but they should also be able to generate new data. The FI app will facilitate data collection by allowing the user to complete field interview cards via their iPhone. This app will upload the data to a server which will then be imported into the Redlands Police Department’s (RPD) records management system.

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Create FI allows the user to enter a new FI while the Search Name function allows the user to search the existing names database. If an existing person is found they can save time entering data by copying over relevant details.

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Personal information is collected in the first data entry option. This includes fields such as name, contact information, appearance information, and identification. Data about the vehicle is captured under the Vehicle Information section. This will allow the user to enter information about the type of vehicle associated with the stop. Finally, users will need to enter data about the location of the field interview. The device’s GPS will be used to provide an estimate of the user’s location. The user will have the ability to override this position if necessary. Users can then take a photo and add any final comments about the location.

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When sufficient information has been filled in, the user will be presented with the screenbelow. Taping on “Complete Interview” sends the FI to the “Stack”, a temporary repository where completed but un-submitted FIs are stored.

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When the data are successfully uploaded to the server the app reports that the transmission has been completed.

 

This project was supported by Award No2010-DE-BX-K006, awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Justice.

 

NearMe

The NearMe app allows personnel to conducted sophisticated crime mapping on their mobile device. Users have the ability to look at crime and officer activity in both a spatial and temporal context.

The NearMe application will provide the user with sophisticated crime analysis capabilities directly from their iPhone. Users will be able to view events both in a spatial extent and through a list view. The user will be able to select crime types, date ranges, and time ranges. Since the last progress report we have resolve an issue regarding data and device security. Using a lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP), users are able to use their standard network credentials to log into the app.

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The app uses basemaps provided by ESRI. Users can select the standard basemap, arial photos, or Redlands parcel data matained by the City of Redlands.

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Users have the ability to select from all the databases maintained by the department. These include records of arrestees, citations, collisions, field interviews (FI), and incidents.

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After selecting a dataset the user has the ability to filter the crime data by a date range. The app also has pre-defined shortcuts that reduce the amount of time it takes to query by common date ranges.

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Users will have the ability to query by time ranges. They can select either time slices or time ranges. Time slices cover a particular range of time across multiple days. For example the user may want to look at crime between 6 AM and 6 PM for the last seven days. Time ranges create a start time and end time when querying crime across a date range. For example, the user may want to look at crimes that occurred between 7 AM Monday and 6 PM on Friday.

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Crime data are displayed in an easy to read and intuitive format.

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This project was supported by Award No2010-DE-BX-K006, awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Justice.

 

Police Flyers

The Police Flyers app allows field personnel to create and distribute informational flyers (e.g. BOLO, wanted person, missing at risk) directly from their iOS device.

Informational flyers represent an important avenue for disseminating information within and between organizations. Informational flyers are typically PDF documents put together on a desktop or mobile computer. Common examples of flyers include, wanted persons, missing at risk, and be-on-the-lookout (BOLO). In most instances these flyers are time sensitive; the faster they can be created and disseminated the more likely they are to provide relevant information to other personnel. The Flyer app was designed to create an easy-to-use platform to create informational flyers directly from mobile devices.

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Workflow was designed to be a simple linear flow that guides users through the various data elements contained within the flyer format. Users are first prompted to select the type of flyer they want to create.

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Users are then prompted to enter their personal information such as name, title, and contact information as well as case information. Personal data are saved across sessions so that users do not need to re-enter this information at the creation of each flyer.

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Next, photos are attached to the flyer. Up to four photos are allowed per flyer. Once a photo is added, an icon of the photo is displayed.

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The user is then prompted to enter descriptive text related to the flyer.

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After all data have been entered the user is prompted to review the final PDF. Users have the ability to zoom, pan, and scroll around the document. Edits can be made by going back and changing previous data fields.

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If the user approves of the draft PDF they are taken to the native iOS email client to distribute the flyer. The native email client was used for consistency and to simplify distribution.

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