National Law Enforcement Roadway Safety Program

 

Project Summary 

The National Law Enforcement Roadway Safety Program (NLERSP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, is a collaborative effort between the National Police Foundation and the Institute for Intergovernmental Research. This evidence-based and data-driven program provides training and technical assistance to state, local, and tribal law enforcement with the goal of reducing the number of officers injured or killed on the nation’s roadways.

The NLERSP provides a suite of no-cost, in-person training courses for executives, patrol officers, and trainers. Additionally, the NLERSP provides customized technical assistance (TA) to agencies to improve their existing training, policies, procedures, and programs related to law enforcement roadway safety. This assistance can include review and development of agency policies on roadway-related issues, review and assessment of an agency’s roadway safety training, assisting with the replication of best practices in agencies, and/or providing research translation services related to roadway safety research.

 

Project Website

For more information about the NLERSP, or to view upcoming training courses, please visit LEOroadwaysafety.org.

 

Funding & Collaboration

This project is made in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and with the Institute for Intergovernmental Research serving as the training provider. A formed Work Group comprised of experts with specific knowledge and expertise in research, law enforcement (primarily roadway safety), training, administration, community businesses and organizations has been established to contribute and lend guidance to assist the Project Team as training and technical assistance components are developed.

 

Point of Contact

Brett Cowell
Senior Project Associate
Direct: 202-833-1471
bcowell@policefoundation.org

 

Keywords

Traffic safety, roadway safety, motor vehicle, officer safety, training, evidence-based policing, collisions, struck-by