News & Announcements

On Policing: Solving Crime & Enhancing Community-Policing Using GPS Tracking Technology

PF On Policing logo final versionIn the newest essay in the On Policing series, Lt. Travis Martinez from the Redlands (CA) Police Department discusses how his department has successfully utilized advanced GPS tracking technology to not only apprehend criminals, but to also increase community satisfaction in the police department. To read the full essay, click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

New Publication: 5 Things You Need to Know About Near-Repeat Patterns and Crime Prevention

The Police Foundation is excited to release the  “5 Things You Need to Know About Near-Repeat Patterns and Crime Prevention,” providing a resource for quick reference on how to apply the science of Near Repeat Theory to crime prevention efforts.

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This latest addition to the Police Foundation’s “5 Things” series outlines the science behind the near repeat pattern for residential burglaries and its implication for proactive policing and crime prevention that can be enhanced by including the community in crime prevention efforts.

When combined with other police data, “near repeat” patterns can be an effective way of increasing the accuracy with which law enforcement can forecast crime. The crime prevention potential of “near repeat” patterns for residential burglaries is the focus of a current Police Foundation project carried out in the Redlands Police Department (RPD) and Baltimore County Police Department (BCOPD), funded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. For more information, please visit our project page: Translating ‘Near Repeat’ Theory into a Geospatial Policing Strategy.

New Brief: “Defining the Role of School-Based Police Officers”

As part of National Community Policing Week, in collaboration with the California Police Chiefs Association and the California State Sheriffs’ Association and with funding from the California Endowment, is proud to release the 3rd brief in a series of youth–focused policy briefs, “Defining the Role of School-Based Police Officers.”

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School-based police officers often serve as educators and mentors, community liaisons and problem solvers, and ensurers of campus safety and security. Many officers develop positive relationships with students and their families and help guide them through the personal, educational, and social pressures that are part of being an adolescent. This brief aims to advance discussions about the roles for school-based officers and how a balanced approach regarding selection of officers, training, and collaboration can strengthen campus safety, respectful relationships, and student success.

This is the third brief in a four part series of youth-focused policy briefs produced to enhance law enforcement knowledge and understanding of youth development in an effort to improve outcomes for youth interactions with law enforcement. California law enforcement executives, and those nationwide, can use this tool as they examine their policies and processes for ways to improve approaches to youth. The first in this series ‘Issue Brief 1: Introduction’ and ‘Issue Brief 2: Teen Brain: Preparing Your Officers to Engage with Youth’ were released earlier this year.  The series will conclude in the coming months with:

  • The Career Pipeline Concept

For more information, visit the Youth Policing Project page.

Police Foundation Releases New Report Showing Strong Potential for Foot Patrol

Arguably, nothing is more important in policing today than gaining and holding the trust of the community, particularly those most affected by crime and violence. Today, the Police Foundation, with generous support from the Charles Koch Foundation, is releasing a new report that provides real-life examples and optimism for how foot patrol can help law enforcement officers and agencies reconnect and build strong, mutually supportive relationships with their communities.

The report, entitled Engaging Communities One Step at a Time, highlights the positive engaging-communities-one-step-at-a-time_cover-250x310interactions and dialogue that are occurring between communities and foot patrol officers from the Cambridge (MA) Police Department, the New Haven (CT) Police Department, the Evanston (IL) Police Department, the Kalamazoo (MI) Department of Public Safety, and the Portland (OR) Police Bureau. The study found that foot patrol facilitates relationship-building between the police and the community while also enhancing the enforcement and problem-solving efforts of law enforcement.

The importance and timeliness of this study cannot be understated. “Given the recent events in policing and the ongoing national conversation about community-police relations, this study offers a glimpse of the positive policing and engagement occurring across the country”, said Jim Bueermann, president of the Police Foundation. Furthermore, it underscores the importance of relationships. As one community member asserted during the study, “The key to policing, no matter where you are in the country, is building relationships. It’s not rocket science.”

To view and download the full report, please click here.

On Policing: Learning Critical Lessons from 9/11, Then and Today

As our country remembers the lives lost and the selfless sacrifices of so many Americans on September 11, 2001, Dr. Frank Straub recalls his own experience in New York City on img_6045that fateful day. In the newest essay in the On Policing series, Dr. Straub stresses the importance of learning from such incidents as 9/11, the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the Pulse Night Club attack, and other critical incidents in order to prevent future tragedies and loss of life. To read the full essay, please click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

New Report: Bringing Calm To Chaos: A Police Foundation review of the San Bernardino terrorist attacks

In December 2015, two terrorists attacked a training session and holiday party for San bringingcalmtochaosimagesmallBernardino County employees, killing 14 and wounding 24 including two police officers. Further losses were averted by the response of the police department, sheriff’s office, emergency services, and FBI, who came together to prevent additional deaths and injuries. This Critical Incident review provides a detailed overview of the incident response; lessons learned to improve responding agencies’ policies, procedures, tactics, systems, culture, and relationships; and guidance to other agencies and first responders as they prepare for responses to terrorist, active shooter or other hostile events, and mass casualty incidents.

To read the e-report, click here.

New Essay: Big Time Trouble Won’t Only Happen in Big Cities

PF On Policing logo final versionThe newest release in the On Policing essay series features Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety Chief Jeffrey Hadley discussing lessons he learned from a series of shootings that occurred in Kalamazoo on February 20, 2016. He emphasizes the critical importance of preparing for critical incidents such as the one experienced by his department, and he stresses the need for an effective communication strategy in the aftermath. To read the full essay, click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

New Brief: “Teen Brain: Preparing Your Officers to Engage with Youth”

Just in time for ‘back to school,’ the Police Foundation, in collaboration with the California Police Chiefs Association and the California State Sheriffs’ Association and with funding from the California Endowment, is proud to release the 2nd brief from a series of youth –focused policy briefs, “Teen Brain: Preparing Your Officers to Engage with Youth.”

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The teen brain can greatly affect police interactions.  The part of the brain responsible for impulse control, problem solving, and decision-making are among the last areas to mature, usually not until an individual’s early twenties. Highlighting examples, this brief explores some agencies that have designed programs and developed resources around the challenges of the teen brain. This brief provides a summary of how law enforcement leaders can focus strategies around teens for impactful and positive interactions.

This is the second brief in a four part series of youth-focused policy briefs produced to enhance law enforcement knowledge and understanding of youth development in an effort to improve outcomes for youth interactions with law enforcement. California law enforcement executives, and those nationwide, can use this tool as they examine their policies and processes for ways to improve approaches to youth. The first in this series ‘Issue Brief 1: Introduction’ was released earlier this year.  The series will continue in the coming months with:

  • Defining the Role of School-Based Police Officers; and
  • The Career Pipeline Concept

For more information, visit the Youth Policing Project page.

Using Near Repeat Patterns for Community-Driven Crime Prevention

Lead researchers on the Police Foundation’s “Translating ‘Near Repeat’ Theory into a Geospatial Policing Strategy” study have published a new article on Near Repeat Patterns for Community-Driven Crime Prevention. Near repeat Near Repeat coverpatterns have been found for a number of crimes, such as residential burglaries, and can be used to design proactive, community-driven crime prevention strategies. Former Police Foundation Senior Research Associate Dr. Travis Taniguchi of RTI International and Dr. Liz Groff of Temple University published the article in the August 2016 issue of The Police Chief magazine.

To read the full article, please click here.  To read more about the Police Foundation study, please click here.

Police Foundation Receives Public Safety Grant Award from Motorola Solutions Foundation

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The Police Foundation is pleased to announce the award of a Public Safety Grant from the Motorola Solutions Foundation. This grant will continue to advance officer safety by supporting the application of the Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss reporting system in law enforcement agencies across the country.

Motorola’s support will allow the Police Foundation to work with key local agency partners in Tempe, Arizona, and Snohomish County, Washington, to implement near miss reporting and analysis at the agency level and train local agency staff regarding the use of the LEO Near Miss system. Additionally, it will enable the Police Foundation and its partner organizations to use near miss incident reports to begin identifying and developing lessons learned to guide operational and tactical decisions and training, which will benefit local partner agencies as well as agencies throughout the U.S.

“The generous support of the Motorola Solutions Foundation will enable us to explore the benefits of near miss reporting and analysis at the agency level in addition to encouraging independent near miss reporting by individual officers.  Ultimately, near miss reporting will benefit individual agencies and the law enforcement profession overall by helping to create a culture of safety” said Jim Bueermann, President of the Police Foundation.

“We wholeheartedly support innovation that enhances public safety,” said Matt Blakely, executive director of the Motorola Solutions Foundation. “The programs we’re supporting will benefit a broad range of communities served by law enforcement officers and staff, fire service personnel, federal agents, emergency medical service providers and our men and women in the military services – both active duty and veterans.”

The foundation gave $3.45 million to 83 organizations in 2016, which will benefit about 1 million first responders and community members.

The Motorola Solutions Foundation serves as an investor and convener on issues that affect the safety of communities around the world, providing leadership in the sector to drive innovation and engage the network of those interested in these issues.

We thank the Motorola Solutions Foundation for their generous support of officer safety. We are proud to partner with Motorola and with the Tempe Police Department, Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office, and many other agencies to improve officer safety.  For more on LEO Near Miss or to submit a report, visit www.LEOnearmiss.org.

COMING SOON!
New Police Foundation Reports and Training Opportunities!