News & Announcements

New Publication Released: How to Conduct an After Action Review – A Guidebook for Agencies of All Sizes

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) and the National Police Foundation will soon be releasing a guidebook detailing how to conduct an after action review (AAR). The guidebook defines the AAR process following incidents and exercises of all sizes and provides an overview of their importance to law enforcement and public safety agencies committed to creating a culture of learning. It also identifies common themes and brief summaries of key findings, recommendations, promising practices, and lessons learned from 20 AARs of mass violence and mass demonstration incidents. It concludes with a detailed step-by-step guide for law enforcement agencies and relevant stakeholders to conduct an AAR with explanations of each step, how the steps tie into the larger process, and additional guidance.

The guidebook also lays out evidence supporting the need to incorporate the AAR process into everyday activities and provides a solid framework and suggestions for undertaking this work in law enforcement agencies of all sizes. AARs are critical to organizational learning and strengthening responses in an evolving and increasingly complex environment. Creating and instilling a culture that encourages continuous learning is vital to ensuring first responder safety and wellness and building effective responses to enhance community safety.

As part of the COPS Office’s effort to provide guidance and education about AARs, a new eLearning course designed for all levels of police practitioners—developed by the Virginia Center for Policing Innovation (VCPI)—has also been released on the COPS Office Training Portal.

To access the AAR Guidebook, visit the COPS website at https://cops.usdoj.gov/RIC/Publications/cops-w0878-pub.pdf, and to sign up for the eLearning course, visit the COPS Office Training Portal at https://copstrainingportal.org/after-action-review-and-reporting-an-introduction/. For more information about conducting an AAR, the AAR process, and a library of mass violence and mass demonstration AARs visit https://www.policefoundation.org/critical-incident-review-library/.

National Police Foundation hosts conference on police body-worn cameras

Dr. Cynthia Lum, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University and National Police Foundation Board Member, provides an overview of current research findings on police body-worn cameras.

The National Police Foundation (NPF) recently hosted a one-day conference: “Police Body Cameras: What Have We Learned Over 10 Years of Deployment?” The purpose of the conference was to share police body-worn camera research findings with practitioners, as well as to hear directly from practitioners whose agencies have deployed the technology and what challenges and opportunities body cameras bring to their agencies and communities.

The conference featured several presentations from researchers, including a presentation by Dr. Cynthia Lum, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University, on an overview of current police body camera literature and findings. In addition, Sean Goodison, Police Executive Research Forum, Daniel Lawrence, Urban Institute, and Kalani Johnson, National Police Foundation, presented on findings from three recent Arnold Ventures studies that have examined how body cameras affect citizen satisfaction with police encounters and implications for law enforcement. David Makin, Washington State University, also presented on whether BWCs capture a true picture of events, providing an overview of research synthesized by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics lab, which has shown that different people view body camera recordings in idiosyncratic ways and that reliance on video recordings may not provide a full or accurate presentation of an event.

Read More & Share

Now available: 2019 Annual Report

The National Police Foundation’s 2019 Annual Report is now available. The report highlights the work the Foundation is doing in four key areas: harnessing the power of science to advance policing, encouraging responsible innovation, protecting the protectors and those they serve, and strengthening trust between police and communities to keep communities safe. Click here to view the report. A digital version of the report can be found at: www.npfannualreport.org.

Best-selling author highlights multiple National Police Foundation policing experiments in his most recent book

As 2019 comes to a close, we find ourselves reflecting on the impact we’ve had throughout the year and contemplating what more we can accomplish in the new year. This year, we were honored to see several of the National Police Foundation’s historic policing experiments highlighted in Malcolm Gladwell’s book, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don’t Know.

In the book, Gladwell describes our efforts to engage with strangers in various contexts in society. As he puts it, “In all of these cases, the parties involved relied on a set of strategies to translate one another’s word and intentions. And, in each case something went very wrong.” Gladwell uses case studies to examine the strategies that motivated or guided each interaction and questions their origins and effectiveness.

Read More & Share

New National Headquarters for the National Police Foundation features mission-oriented quotes from policing leaders

The new national headquarters for the Foundation sits between the newly announced Amazon headquarters and the also recently announced innovation campus of Virginia Tech, in Crystal City, Virginia.

The Foundation’s new state-of-the-art training and conference center (located onsite) showcases quotes from policing leaders and historic figures such as Lee Brown, Sir Robert Peel, Larry Sherman, and William J. Bratton. The quotes are designed to promote community engagement and a renewed focus on evidence-based policing.

“Of all the ideas in policing, one stands out as the most powerful force for change: police practices should be based on scientific evidence about what works best.” — Professor Lawrence W. Sherman

“The police must secure the willing cooperation of the public in voluntary observance of the law to be able to secure and maintain public respect.” — The Right Honourable Sir Robert Peel

“The reality is that there is a divide between the police and some people in communities that need us most, but that divide can be bridged—the reality is that the people and the police can be partners.” — Commissioner William J. Bratton

The Foundation looks forward to hosting its partners and colleagues in 2020 at its new headquarters.

National Police Foundation evaluates Crime Gun Intelligence Centers in eight local jurisdictions

Crime Gun Intelligence Centers (CGIC) are an interagency collaboration focused on the immediate collection, management, and analysis of crime gun evidence, such as cartridge casings, in real time, to identify shooters, disrupt criminal activity, and to prevent future violence. CGICs rely on an ongoing collaboration between the ATF, local police department, crime laboratory, probation and parole, prosecuting attorneys, U.S. Attorney’s Office (USAO), crime analysts, community groups, and academic organizations.

In Los Angeles, CA the post-CGIC period demonstrated a decrease of 18.9% in homicides, a 7.7% decrease in firearm-related homicides, and the firearm related robbery rate decreased by 3.1%. Uchida, C., Quigley, A., Anderson, K. Evaluating the Los Angeles Crime Gun Intelligence Center (2019) (Photo by: National Police Foundation)

Through its National Resource and Technical Assistance Center (NRTAC) for Improving Law Enforcement Investigations, the National Police Foundation (NPF) is providing training and technical assistance to jurisdictions participating in the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) Local Crime Gun Intelligence Center Initiative. These sites promote interagency collaboration focused on the immediate collection, management, and analysis of crime gun evidence across local, state, and federal partners. The primary outcome of CGIC sites is the identification of armed violent offenders for investigation and prosecution. Other outcomes include: identifying crime gun source, efficiently allocating resources, providing decision-makers with the most accurate crime data available, increasing case closure rates, advancing public safety, and preventing gun crime.

Read More & Share

National Police Foundation selected to develop critical incident preparedness and response training for public safety leaders

The National Police Foundation, with funding from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, is developing a professional leadership development specialized training program for public safety leaders. The curriculum will be grounded in the lessons learned and best practices identified through rigorous after-action studies of mass violence incidents and responses to them. Focus areas will include tactical and command lessons learned at major incidents, threat assessment, mental health and resilience of responders, and best and next practices in preparation for, response to, and recovery from mass casualty attacks. The training will be piloted in the Summer of 2020.

Alert: The National Police Foundation NEVER Solicits Donations via Telephone!

The National Police Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based national non-profit organization, has received inquiries from across the U.S. by individuals who have been contacted by solicitors asking for donations in support of an organization of the same or similar name. We want to make the public aware that the National Police Foundation or Police Foundation does not now and never has solicited individual donations over the phone.

If you have been contacted via telephone and asked to make donations to the National Police Foundation in Washington, D.C. or the Police Foundation location in Washington, D.C., this is a scam.

Please note that many legitimate local (but unaffiliated) police foundations and organizations may solicit donations from local communities via telephone and mail. If you receive such a call, we encourage you to take note of who is calling (by name and number), the date and time. We also encourage you to require donation information to be sent to you via U.S. Mail before considering any donation or even pledging one.

What you should do if you are receiving unwanted calls:

1. Call your State’s charity registration agency and report the information. You can find a list of your state’s registration agency here (https://www.nasconet.org/resources/state-government/). It does not matter if the caller is from another State, it is your State agency that can protect you.

2. Report telemarketing fraud to the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) online at https://www.ftc.gov/faq/consumer-protection/submit-consumer-complaint-ftc

3. Contact your State Attorney General’s Office to understand how they protect State residents from telemarketing fraud. Many offices have consumer protection units.

4. Consider using a call-blocking feature through your telephone service provider and/or a mobile app to block calls from unknown or suspected telemarketing numbers.

5. Tell solicitors that you will NOT now or EVER make any donation or pledge over the phone and demand that they provide you with the number they are calling from, their full name, the charity name, the website address where their IRS Form 990 can be found, and their physical address.

The National Police Foundation ONLY receives donations online via our website or via U.S. mail at the address listed on our website. We are registered as a charity in every state that requires registration and we are a GuideStar Platinum Charity—a designation given to charities that meet strict criteria around transparency.

PRIVACY POLICY AS IT RELATES TO MAKING A DONATION TO THE NATIONAL POLICE FOUNDATION

Our donations are handled through a third party service provider: Give Lively, LLC, which has its own privacy and security policies. Our secure donation page can be viewed at https://secure.givelively.org/donate/police-foundation.

For more information, please view the National Police Foundation’s Privacy Policy: https://www.policefoundation.org/privacy-policy/

Keywords: fraud, scam, fraud alert, donations, solicitations 

Law enforcement agencies in 78 percent of states in Mexico aim to achieve the “gold standard” in public safety accreditation

MEXICO CITY—Law enforcement agencies in more than three-fourths of all states in Mexico have officially committed to pursuing international law enforcement accreditation through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA). CALEA was established in 1979 and is a credentialing authority that awards accreditation to public safety agencies in the US, Mexico, Canada, and Barbados that demonstrate meeting an established set of professional standards based on industry best practices.

This initiative, made available to law enforcement agencies in Mexico, is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Mérida Initiative, with additional training and technical assistance provided by the National Police Foundation.

There are currently more than 75 state, municipal, and federal public safety agencies pursuing or maintaining CALEA accreditation in Mexico, including police departments, public safety training academies, public safety communication centers, and as of October 2019, Mexico’s first public safety investigative agency. In November of 2018, CALEA inaugurated its first accreditation hearing in Mexico City.

Read More & Share

National Police Foundation Selected to Conduct New Experiments in Police Practices

The National Police Foundation has been selected by the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to conduct a scientific study of two critical areas of police practice: police stops in violent crime hot spots and eyewitness field identification or “show up” accuracy.

The National Police Foundation and George Mason University will conduct a randomized control trial to test the idea that stops can be conducted in such a way that reduces crime and that can be implemented effectively, legally, and without alienating the community.

The National Police Foundation will also conduct a lab study replication of the findings of a previous study on confidence and accuracy in eyewitness identification using show-ups; a field study testing the same question as part of actual police eyewitness procedures; and a survey of current practices in eyewitness identification that will help update our knowledge of changes in the field related to eyewitness identification practices and the extent to which these are evidence-based.

Both studies will benefit from the experience of the Foundation’s in-house research scientists, who have a long history of conducting scientific experiments to advance policing— including studies focused on patrol practices, use of force, shift lengths and crime reduction strategies. For more information on our research, see our Project Page and Publications.