News & Events

Attend the Upcoming 2017 ASEBP Annual Conference!

The American Society of Evidence-Based Policing (ASEBP) is hosting their annual conference on May 22-23 in Phoenix, Arizona. The conference will focus on evidence-based tactics and strategies being used in policing today. Panels of prominent criminologists and policing leaders will cover topics such as procedural justice, predictive analytics, police legitimacy, use of force, and and mental health. Read More & Share

Join the “Stand With Honor” Program

stand with honorThe National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund has just launched a new program in support of the National Law Enforcement Museum called “Stand With Honor.” This is a lifetime membership program being offered to active and retired law enforcement officers.  Some of the benefits include free admission to the Museum for life, special VIP treatment when you visit the Museum and, most importantly, a chance to have your law enforcement story told in the Museum (e.g., where you served, when you served, and memorable moments in your career to be captured and shared at the Museum forever!).  Read More & Share

Fraud Alert: Calls Soliciting Donations for the “Police Foundation”

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The Police Foundation, a national, Washington, D.C.-based non-profit organization dedicated to advancing policing through science and innovation, has received information from several individuals who have been contacted by solicitors asking for donations in support of the “Police Foundation.”

The Police Foundation does NOT solicit donations from anyone via phone. If you have been contacted via telephone and asked to make donations to the national Police Foundation in Washington, D.C., this is a scam.

Please note that many legitimate local (and unaffiliated) police foundations and organizations DO solicit donations from local communities and may do so via telephone. If you receive such a call, we encourage you to take note of who is calling (by name and number), the date and time. We also encourage you to require donation information to be sent to you via U.S. Mail before considering any donation.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) maintains an online reporting system for telemarketing and other scams, which can be found at https://www.ftc.gov/faq/consumer-protection/submit-consumer-complaint-ftc and many State Attorneys General offer assistance in reporting and responding to fraud.

The Police Foundation will closely monitor the information and complaints it receives and will share information with authorities as appropriate.

BJA Releases Solicitation for the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP)

BJA logoFUNDING UPDATE

Today the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), U.S. Department of Justice released the solicitation for the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP), funded through the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA).

Who will be eligible to apply for BJA’s Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP)?
As laid out in CARA, applicants may include state agencies, units of local government, and federally-recognized Native American and Alaskan tribal governments.  BJA will also accept applications that involve two or more entities, including treatment providers and other not-for-profit agencies, and regional applications that propose to carry out the funded federal award activities. Specific eligibility requirements by category can be found here.

What can be funded through this program? 
BJA’s COAP site-based solicitation contains six categories of funding.  The funding categories include:

  • Category 1: Overdose Outreach Projects
  • Category 2: Technology-assisted Treatment projects
  • Category 3: System-level Diversion and Alternative to Incarceration Projects
  • Category 4: Statewide Planning, Coordination, and Implementation Projects
  • Category 5: Harold Rogers PDMP Implementation and Enhancement Projects
  • Category 6: Data-driven Responses to Prescription Drug Misuse

How can potential applicants plan and prepare for applying?
To prepare for the CARA solicitation, potential applicants are encouraged to form multi-disciplinary teams, or leverage existing planning bodies, and identify comprehensive strategies to develop, implement, or expand treatment diversion and alternative to incarceration programs.

How many awards will be made?
BJA anticipates up to 45 awards may be made under the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant program.

What is the application deadline? 
The application deadline is April 25, 2017.

Where can I find additional information?
The official BJA document on the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant program can be located here.

For more information and for current funding updates and training opportunities, visit http://www.addictionpolicy.org/cara-grants.

Law Enforcement Leaders Call for Federal Support & Prioritization of Violent Crime Reduction

While national crime statistics remain historically low, violent crime—particularly homicides and shootings—is rising in many major cities. The Police Foundation and the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA), with generous support from the Joyce Foundation, are jointly releasing a report entitled, Reducing Violent Crime in American Cities: An Opportunity to Lead. The report provides more than 25 recommendations for the new Administration and Congress, to strengthen federal-local partnerships and support local efforts to reduce violent crime.

Screen Shot 2017-01-25 at 14.57.16According to FBI data, the country’s largest cities experienced a 10% increase in homicide and non-negligent murder from 2014 to 2015, and the second largest group of cities saw a 20% surge. More recent data from MCCA suggest these surges in large cities remains steady, with 61 agencies reporting a 10% increase in homicide from 2015 to 2016, and 1400 additional non-fatal shootings over 2015, another important indicator of violent crime. Law enforcement agencies in many of these cities are also reporting substantial increases in non-fatal shootings, another important indicator of violent crime. While the federal government has provided important assistance in recent years, budget and personnel reductions coupled with competing federal priorities leave some local law enforcement agencies without the fortified partnerships they need to effectively combat violent crime. Law enforcement leaders call for a federal agenda that prioritizes violent crime from both a budgetary and policy standpoint, and that addresses problems with evidence-based solutions.

“Major cities aren’t asking for temporary surges of hundreds more federal agents or responses that take months and years to have a sustained impact. They want tools and smart resources like ballistics imaging, gun tracing, and flexible grants,” said Chief Tom Manger, President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA). Police Foundation President Jim Bueermann further emphasizes that “federal, state and local law enforcement need strong partnerships and smart, evidence-based, locally-tailored strategies to reverse trends in the number of shootings in many major cities.”

The recommendations in this report create an overarching strategy to address violence by prioritizing violent crime, holding federal partners accountable for local impacts, and enabling the kinds of partnerships that will create lasting solutions. The following items form the basis of the report’s recommendations: analysis of literature on effective violence reduction strategies; in-depth analysis of federal agency programs, budgets, priorities, authorities, and performance; and, survey data and input from local law enforcement executives.

To view and download the Full Report, please click here.

To view and download the Executive Brief, please click here.

Input Needed! Nominate Innovative Programs Responding to Addiction

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Our organization, in collaboration with the Addiction Policy Forum, is excited to launch a new project featuring innovative programs to address addiction in the fields of prevention, treatment, recovery support, overdose reversal, criminal justice reform and law enforcement strategies.

Last month, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released the 2015 drug overdose death data, which showed a significant increase from 47,055 drug overdose deaths in 2014 to 52,404 – an average of 144 drug overdose deaths each day.

However, many states and communities all over the country have created innovative programs to address substance use disorders in their area and we believe they deserve recognition for their hard work in the face of a national epidemic. Innovations in addressing the disease of addiction will help change the way our country views addiction, and featuring these great programs move this forward.

We would like to invite you to nominate programs your organization believes are innovative in these fields. All nominated programs will be reviewed and considered by the Addiction Policy Forum’s National Advisory Board. Selected programs will receive the following:

  • National recognition as an innovation, including announcement to the media and key policymakers;
  • A feature article published on the Addiction Policy Forum website and delivered to over 200 partner organizations
  • A seal of recognition to include on their website and organizational websites; and,
  • Inclusion in a compilation of innovative programs to be published by the Addiction Policy Forum

If you or your organization is interested in nominating a program, please complete the nomination form available here:  Nominate a Program.

Submissions will be reviewed on a rolling basis until March 31st, 2017.

New Release: The Importance of Shop with a Cop

PF On Policing logo final versionAs we enjoy the holiday season and spend time with friends and family, one police department is taking the opportunity to make a special impact on its community. In our newest essay, Beaumont (CA) Police Chief Sean Thuilliez explains how his department’s annual Shop with a Cop event is a great way to not only connect and build relationships with the community, but to also provide for children who may otherwise not receive any gifts for Christmas. To read the full essay, click here. And if you missed the recent essays on pre-arrest diversion programs and deadly force encounters, be sure to visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

New Essay: It’s Not Weak to Feel Psychological Trauma – It’s Human

PF On Policing logo final thumbnailOn the one-year anniversary of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, clinical psychologist Tammy McCoy-Arballo discusses the myriad of emotions and thoughts officers can experience in the aftermath of such an incident. She stresses that “those who develop post-incident reactions are not weak – they are human.” To read the full essay, click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

21st Century Cures Act Passes in the House of Representatives

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A message from Police Foundation President Jim Bueermann:

I am pleased to share the news that the 21st Century Cures Act  passed  the House of Representatives last night with an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote of 392-26. As I shared previously, the bill, while primarily focused on medical innovation, contains critical provisions on criminal justice. I was most pleased by inclusion of a provision that would provide for the creation of a National Criminal Justice and Mental Health Training Center, which would coordinate best practices on responding to mental illness in the criminal justice system and provide technical assistance to governmental agencies.

Here’s a list of 7 things the bill does to support law enforcement:

1.  Law Enforcement Training – Authorizes resources for police responses to individuals with mental illness and de-escalation training.

2.  National Criminal Justice and Mental Health Training Center – Creates a new center to coordinate best practices on responding to individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system and provide technical assistance to governmental agencies.

3.  Diversion Programs – Allows state and local governments to use grant funds on programs to divert individuals with mental illness and co-occurring disorders from prisons and jails.

4.  Crisis Intervention Teams – Expands resources available to state and local governments to develop and operate school-based mental health crisis intervention teams that include coordination with law enforcement agencies.

5.  Focus on Evidence-Based Research – Requires the Department of Justice to prioritize grant applications to those who use evidence-based interventions and risk assessment tools to reduce recidivism.

6.  Mental Health Response and Corrections Programs – Allows funds from existing federal grant programs to be used in new ways, such as on specialized mental health response training like crisis de-escalation techniques.

7.  Active-Shooter Training – Permanently authorizes the VALOR Initiative to provide crisis training and active-shooter training for federal, state and local law enforcement officials.

8.  Reauthorization of the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act (MIOTCRA) – an essential funding mechanism that supports the use of mental health courts and crisis intervention teams in local law enforcement agencies. The bill would extend MIOTCRA, effectively filling critical gaps in the system, including providing additional resources for veterans’ treatment courts to help those suffering from behavioral or post-traumatic stress disorders.

This bill is a needed step along the way to strengthening our nation’s criminal justice system and ensuring that people with mental illness are treated well by it. Law enforcement professionals are a huge part of the system and I am glad that the bill recognized this and provided solid policy provisions designed to aid the community in its work each day.

Fortunately, Police Foundation was at the table in crafting these important provisions, having worked with key champions on the Hill to advance this work and having sent a letter of support. Thank you to those who lent their names to that effort. I look forward to keeping you updated as we follow the bill’s progress through the Senate and then onward to the President for his signature, which we hope to see finalized within the next two weeks.

 

Chief Jim Bueermann (Ret.)
President
Police Foundation

A Message from Police Foundation President Jim Bueermann

jim-buerrmannDear Friends,

I think it is safe to say that 2016 has been a year that many of us will remember for a very long time. The question is, what will we remember about 2016?

Will we just remember the Presidential election? Will we remember a favorite entertainer or political figure that passed, or a major sporting event? Will we remember the very difficult year that the men and women in policing have had while attempting to serve and protect? Or will we remember the difficult times communities had trying to understand complicated policing issues?

This year has been particularly challenging, with unacceptable attacks on police, an astounding number of ambush attacks, controversial police use-of-force cases and community protests. We struggled to find strategies that reduce and keep crime low, while building community trust. Don’t get me wrong, policing’s men and women responded well, with unity, pride, courage, and a redoubling of efforts to reach out, despite protests and violence. I am proud of my former colleagues who serve as Chiefs, Sheriffs, Directors, Commissioners and Superintendents, who have done more than their share to understand and engage the community and political leaders, but also fulfill their solemn duty to support, defend, and lead those who serve. And I am proud of the work we’ve undertaken to support them and to help communities build trust and confidence in their policing agencies.

The Police Foundation is honored to serve and support these leaders and the many outstanding men and women who form the thin blue line that separates good from evil, trust from betrayal, and honor from dishonor. Together, they are the foundation of our democracy. Our 2016 accomplishments and successes are dedicated to each of them, and they are significant.

In 2016, the Police Foundation conducted a critical incident review of the devastating terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, and we reached hundreds of law enforcement officers with information about near-misses, based on reports to our Law Enforcement Officer Near Miss Database. We published a foot patrol study that demonstrated the potential of foot patrols in reducing crime and enhancing community relations. We developed and released a popular and practical infographic on use of force that has been utilized in dozens of agencies around the country for training staff and educating citizens, and we launched an online blog series called “On Policing”, giving policing leaders and others an opportunity to share their thoughts on America’s most noble profession. Several of these projects were funded entirely, or in large part, by the Police Foundation itself, without reliance on grants or contracts.

We are hopeful that 2017 will be a better year for policing. But we also know that our work – advancing policing through innovation and science – will be needed more than ever. Our research portfolio has expanded tremendously. We started a new study on the effect of legitimacy in hot spots policing, are continuing an unprecedented data collection effort with the Major Cities Chiefs to study officer-involved shootings, and will serve as the sustaining partner for the National Police Research Platform, a groundbreaking initiative to provide law enforcement agencies with near real-time access to data and analysis. Our training and technical assistance portfolio will expand to assist agencies in leveraging technology, enhancing officer safety, and improving the quality of law enforcement investigations. At the same time, we will continue efforts to further explore the use of unmanned systems, advanced analytics and data practices, robotics, and virtual and augmented realities.

To continue making progress – to see research put into practice, officer safety improved, and the development of a profession more prepared for future challenges – we need your help. As we prepare for new challenges in 2017, please consider making a donation to support the work we do for law enforcement professionals. To make a donation, please click here or click the Donate button below. The Police Foundation is an exempt organization under IRC section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible to the full extent of the law and will help us continue our critical work.


Any level of support is appreciated. Even if you are not in a position to donate, I hope you will join me in sharing the news about our mission, our work, and our commitment.
 
Sincerely,

Jim Bueermann

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