2016 Body-Worn Camera Symposium

On January 21, 2016 in Washington, DC, the Police Foundation, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Major Cities Chiefs Association, and SafeGov.org, convened more than 150 law enforcement officials along with legal professionals, security and privacy experts, and policy advisors for a day-long symposium, entitled “Body-Worn Cameras: Building a Secure and Manageable Program for Law Enforcement.” With rising interest and a growing call for body-worn cameras (BWC) to be deployed by law enforcement throughout the U.S. and other parts of the world, this invitation-only, one-day forum was designed to feature active and open dialogue for members of the law enforcement community to discuss important and complex issues being faced as they work to implement trusted, secure, and manageable body-worn camera programs in their jurisdictions.

Each tab below represents a different lecture during our event. Click on a lecture’s tab to view video footage, presenter information, and their respective presentation materials.

Opening Remarks & Overview
This Keynote will provide an overview of the current landscape for body-worn camera deployments in the United States, including the broader law enforcement environment, public policy demands, and status of deployments across the country. This keynote will also highlight some of the major issues confronting law enforcement and policy makers, including concerns regarding the management of body-worn camera data, the security of that data, and the policies governing how it’s used.

     
     
     

  • Presenter: Jim Burch, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Police Foundation
  • Presenter: Jim Baker, Director, Law Enforcement Operations and Support, International Association of Chiefs of Police
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Opening Keynote

     
     
     

  • Presenter: Chief Tom Manger, President, Major Cities Chiefs Association
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Survey Results

     
     
     

  • Presenter: The Honorable Charles DeWitt, Legislative and Policy Advisor, Major Cities Chiefs Police Association
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    View The Survey Results

Changing the Way Law Enforcement Does Business
The deployment of body-worn cameras is part of a larger shift in law enforcement community relations. In an effort to enhance transparency of operations and to ensure accountability, agencies are adopting body-worn cameras to document police/citizen interactions. Research suggests that body-worn cameras have a positive influence on the behavior of both officers and citizens, reducing the number of instances where officers use force, as well as the number of complaints that citizens file. Body-worn cameras, however, are only a tool to support more strategic changes in the nature of policing, including broader community engagement and training in critical incident de-escalation. How does the deployment of body-worn cameras and other technologies impact agencies, commanders, supervisors, and line officers? What changes need to be made to accommodate these changes? What can law enforcement agencies do to prepare for these changes?

     

  • Facilitator: Paul Rosenzweig, Senior Advisor, The Chertoff Group
  • Panelist: Jim Baker, Director, Law Enforcement Operations and Support, International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • Panelist: Dr. Chris Koper, Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University
  • Panelist: Chief Eddie Reyes, Deputy Chief of Police, Alexandria Police Department
  • Panelist: Corey Stoughton, Senior Counsel, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice
Privacy and Victims’ Rights
Enhancing transparency of operations and holding police accountable for their actions are two of the principal reasons law enforcement agencies are adopting body-worn cameras. Police body-worn cameras, however, are also likely to capture citizens in difficult and emotionally charged situations, in vulnerable and embarrassing circumstances, and in private and personal settings. Videos may also capture images of children, innocent family members, and witnesses indirectly involved in the incident. Recording video in virtually every encounter between police and the public raises profound privacy implications that need to be weighed with broader program objectives. How do agencies balance growing public demands for greater transparency with respecting the privacy rights of victims, children and vulnerable populations? Should body-worn video be subject to the same Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests as other official documents? How should agencies ensure the security and integrity of body-worm camera videos?

  • Facilitator: David Roberts, Senior Program Manager, Technology Center, International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • Presenter: Bill Schrier, Chief Information Officer, Seattle Police
  • Presenter: Jay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst, American Civil Liberties Union
  • Presenter: Chief Eddie Reyes, Deputy Chief of Police, Alexandria Police Department
  • Presenter: Sharon Woo, Assistant District Attorney, City and County of San Francisco
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Keynote: Current State of Play for Law Enforcement Body-Worn Camera Deployment in the United States
This Keynote will provide an overview of the current landscape for body-worn camera deployments in the United States, including the broader law enforcement environment, public policy demands, and status of deployments across the country. This keynote will also highlight some of the major issues confronting law enforcement and policy makers, including concerns regarding the management of body-worn camera data, the security of that data, and the policies governing how it’s used.

     
     
     

  • Speaker: The Honorable Michael Chertoff, Executive Chairman of The Chertoff Group and former U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary
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Managing the Body-Worn Camera Workload
Every officer wearing a body-worn camera is likely to generate hundreds of hours and over 100GB of video data every year. Managing the equipment, the infrastructure, and burgeoning volume of digital evidence that invariably results from BWC programs poses significant challenges to agencies of all sizes. Many agencies will turn to emerging technologies for cloud storage, data analytics, redaction, and machine learning to help them collect, store, manage and secure an exponentially growing volume of digital data. What experiences have agencies already had in procuring, deploying, and managing the equipment, infrastructure, and technologies associated with body-worn cameras? What impact does this technology have on how prosecutors and law enforcement build and manage their caseloads? What policies need to be in place to ensure the proper handling of this data? How can law enforcement agencies prepare for future technological changes?

  • Facilitator: Jeff Gould, President, SafeGov
  • Presenter: Sgt. Dan Gomez, Los Angeles Police Department
  • Presenter: Bob Haas, Commissioner, Cambridge Police Department
  • Presenter: Major Stephen Willis, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
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Ask the Experts: What You Need to Know About Deploying BWCs
A number of major U.S. law enforcement agencies have already implemented large-scale pilot programs or completed full deployments of body-worn cameras across their law enforcement agencies. This is your opportunity to ask clarifying questions from our expert panelists and hear real world experiences when enacting a body-worn camera program, including unforeseen challenges, opportunities, and ongoing considerations.

  • Facilitator: James Burch, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Police Foundation
  • Presenter: Sergeant. Dan Gomez, Los Angeles Police Department
  • Presenter: Inspector Steve Goodier, Hampshire Constabulary (UK)
  • Presenter: Paul Rosenzweig, Senior Advisor, The Chertoff Group
  • Presenter: Major Stephen Willis, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
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Assessing the Broader Impact of Body-Worn Camera Video
The widespread adoption and deployment of police body-worn camera represents a host of policy, legal, operational, and technical challenges for prosecutors and the judiciary. What additional hardware, software, infrastructure, storage, and technical expertise do prosecutors and courts need to manage the vastly growing volume of digital evidence? What is the impact of managing digital evidence across different police agencies and potentially different equipment? What impact does body-worn camera video have on discovery? How are multiple videos generated in a single incident integrated into a coherent and accurate narrative?

  • Facilitator: Bryan Cunningham, Senior Advisor, The Chertoff Group
  • Presenter: Nelson Bunn, Director, National District Attorneys Association
  • Presenter: Bob Haas, Commissioner, Cambridge Police Department
  • Presenter: Antonia Merzon, Colorado District Attorneys’ Council
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Body-Worn Cameras Abroad
While some of the largest body-worn camera deployments have occurred in the United States, other countries have also engaged in body-worn camera video pilots for their Police services. Studies in the U.K., Canada, and other countries have revealed interesting and unexpected outcomes which demonstrate both the value of body-worn camera deployments and some of the challenges that departments face during implementation. Do cameras help in the investigative and prosecutorial processes? How have international deployments fared? What obstacles have international law enforcement encountered? What do international deployments tell us about what we should expect here at home?

  • Facilitator: Darrel Stephens, Executive Director, Major Cities Chiefs Association
  • Presenter: Tom Ellis, University of Portsmouth (UK)
  • View The Presentation

  • Presenter: Inspector Steve Goodier, Hampshire Constabulary (UK)
  • View The Presentation

  • Presenter: Chief Rod Knecht, Edmonton Police Service
  • View The Presentation

Closing Remarks & Takeaways

     
     
     

  • Presenter: James Burch, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Police Foundation
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