Archives Sarah Solano

BJA Releases Solicitation for the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP)

BJA logoFUNDING UPDATE

Today the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), U.S. Department of Justice released the solicitation for the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP), funded through the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA).

Who will be eligible to apply for BJA’s Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant Program (COAP)?
As laid out in CARA, applicants may include state agencies, units of local government, and federally-recognized Native American and Alaskan tribal governments.  BJA will also accept applications that involve two or more entities, including treatment providers and other not-for-profit agencies, and regional applications that propose to carry out the funded federal award activities. Specific eligibility requirements by category can be found here.

What can be funded through this program? 
BJA’s COAP site-based solicitation contains six categories of funding.  The funding categories include:

  • Category 1: Overdose Outreach Projects
  • Category 2: Technology-assisted Treatment projects
  • Category 3: System-level Diversion and Alternative to Incarceration Projects
  • Category 4: Statewide Planning, Coordination, and Implementation Projects
  • Category 5: Harold Rogers PDMP Implementation and Enhancement Projects
  • Category 6: Data-driven Responses to Prescription Drug Misuse

How can potential applicants plan and prepare for applying?
To prepare for the CARA solicitation, potential applicants are encouraged to form multi-disciplinary teams, or leverage existing planning bodies, and identify comprehensive strategies to develop, implement, or expand treatment diversion and alternative to incarceration programs.

How many awards will be made?
BJA anticipates up to 45 awards may be made under the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant program.

What is the application deadline? 
The application deadline is April 25, 2017.

Where can I find additional information?
The official BJA document on the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Grant program can be located here.

For more information and for current funding updates and training opportunities, visit http://www.addictionpolicy.org/cara-grants.

Law Enforcement Leaders Call for Federal Support & Prioritization of Violent Crime Reduction

While national crime statistics remain historically low, violent crime—particularly homicides and shootings—is rising in many major cities. The Police Foundation and the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA), with generous support from the Joyce Foundation, are jointly releasing a report entitled, Reducing Violent Crime in American Cities: An Opportunity to Lead. The report provides more than 25 recommendations for the new Administration and Congress, to strengthen federal-local partnerships and support local efforts to reduce violent crime.

Screen Shot 2017-01-25 at 14.57.16According to FBI data, the country’s largest cities experienced a 10% increase in homicide and non-negligent murder from 2014 to 2015, and the second largest group of cities saw a 20% surge. More recent data from MCCA suggest these surges in large cities remains steady, with 61 agencies reporting a 10% increase in homicide from 2015 to 2016, and 1400 additional non-fatal shootings over 2015, another important indicator of violent crime. Law enforcement agencies in many of these cities are also reporting substantial increases in non-fatal shootings, another important indicator of violent crime. While the federal government has provided important assistance in recent years, budget and personnel reductions coupled with competing federal priorities leave some local law enforcement agencies without the fortified partnerships they need to effectively combat violent crime. Law enforcement leaders call for a federal agenda that prioritizes violent crime from both a budgetary and policy standpoint, and that addresses problems with evidence-based solutions.

“Major cities aren’t asking for temporary surges of hundreds more federal agents or responses that take months and years to have a sustained impact. They want tools and smart resources like ballistics imaging, gun tracing, and flexible grants,” said Chief Tom Manger, President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA). Police Foundation President Jim Bueermann further emphasizes that “federal, state and local law enforcement need strong partnerships and smart, evidence-based, locally-tailored strategies to reverse trends in the number of shootings in many major cities.”

The recommendations in this report create an overarching strategy to address violence by prioritizing violent crime, holding federal partners accountable for local impacts, and enabling the kinds of partnerships that will create lasting solutions. The following items form the basis of the report’s recommendations: analysis of literature on effective violence reduction strategies; in-depth analysis of federal agency programs, budgets, priorities, authorities, and performance; and, survey data and input from local law enforcement executives.

To view and download the Full Report, please click here.

To view and download the Executive Brief, please click here.

New Release: Community-Led Policing

PF On Policing logo final version In the newest On Policing essay, Riley County Police Captain and Police Foundation Executive Fellow Tim Hegarty discusses the concept of community-led policing. In this model, he explains, there is no need for civilian oversight of the police, as the public and the police share the responsibility for determining the course of policing in their community. Be sure to check out the essay here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

 

Community-Led Policing

Tim Hegarty photo 2By Tim Hegarty
Captain of the Support Services Division
Riley County Police Department

Current models of civilian oversight explicitly separate the roles of the community and the police in the decision-making process. In fact, most civilian oversight exists to address the consequences of decisions already made by the police. The Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing reinforces this separation by recommending “some form of civilian oversight in order to strengthen trust with the community,” and yet it acknowledges there is no evidence to support this recommendation. The President’s Task Force rightly calls for more research into the efficacy of civilian oversight, but there is another model that may be better suited to address the police legitimacy concerns fueling the demand for civilian oversight. Read More & Share

Upcoming 2016 Trace Evidence Data Workshop

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On Tuesday, July 19, 2016 through Wednesday, July 20, 2016, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be holding a FREE Trace Evidence Data Workshop, focused on improving technology and measurement in forensic science. Practitioners and researchers in the forensic science community will have the opportunity to provide feedback on improving access and expanding the development of datasets useful for trace forensic evidence. For more information or to register for the workshop, please click here. Participants must register by July 12, 2016.

The NIST is one of the nation’s oldest physical science laboratories, founded in 1901 as a measurement infrastructure. NIST measurements support technologies ranging from nanoscale devices to global communication networks.

On Policing: Taking Emergency Medicine In The Field To A SMART Level

PF On Policing logo final versionIn this week’s On Policing essay, Dr. Michael Neeki, a volunteer member of the Inland Valley SWAT team, stresses the need for the creation of specially trained medical teams to respond to terrorist attacks, active shooter scenarios, and natural disasters. In order to increase victim survival in these incidents, Dr. Neeki proposes an innovative program entitled Special Medical Anti-terror Response Team (SMART). This program would make teams of trauma-trained doctors, nurses, and paramedics available 24-7 to respond to mass casualty incidents. Click here to read more or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

 

Taking Emergency Medicine in the Field to a SMART Level

Dr. Neeki and three medics pose for photos at the Colton inpound area. By Dr. Michael Neeki
Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Arrowhead Regional Medical Center 

I left Iran more than three decades ago to escape fanatical religious extremism. As one can imagine, I was greatly disheartened upon seeing such zealotry in my home of the United States that fateful day of December 2nd, when the San Bernardino terrorist attack occurred.

I am greatly honored to have been part of the Inland Valley SWAT team, supporting the brave members of the San Bernardino city police and fire department during that tragic event. However, this experience was profoundly sad and devastating due to the loss of life to 14 innocent people, all of whom simply went to work that morning. The work of the first responders to the terrorist attack prevented further loss of life that day. Read More & Share

Upcoming 2016 National Geospatial Preparedness Summit

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On Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 8:00 A.M. EDT through Wednesday, September 14th at 4:00 P.M. EDT, the National Alliance for Public Safety GIS (NAPSG) Foundation will be hosting the 2016 National Geospatial Preparedness Summit. As the Nation’s only preparedness summit dedicated to advancing the use of location-enabled decision support technology and data, this summit will provide a unique opportunity for Public Safety Operators, Leaders, and GIS Responders to acquire new skills and share best practices through hands-on training and simulations. For more information or to register for the event, please click here. Attendance is FREE for public sector participants!

The National Alliance for Public Safety GIS Foundation (NAPSG) is a not-for-profit organization that was formed in 2005 to overcome the challenges faced by Federal, tribal, state, and local public safety agencies. The goal of the NAPSG Foundation is to enhance public safety through the power of geospatial technology and data. The NAPSG Foundation provides education and training to GIS responders and public safety practitioners through tools such as standard operating guides, live workshops, regional summits, exercises, and virtual webinars.