Archives Erica Richardson

National Police Foundation releases new report – National Survey on Officer Safety Training: Findings and Implications

August 13, 2020—The National Police Foundation (NPF), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), is pleased to release the National Survey on Officer Safety Training: Findings and Implications, along with its accompanying Executive Brief, and interactive website. The report presents the results of a national survey developed and administered by NPF to examine the officer safety and wellness training and resource needs of law enforcement officers and executives.

The survey is part of the BJA Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement and Ensuring Officer Resilience and Survivability (VALOR) Initiative. BJA created the VALOR Officer Safety and Wellness Initiative to improve officer safety training resources and opportunities available to the law enforcement community in the United States. The goal of the Initiative is to increase officer safety and resilience and strengthen officer wellness. Since the creation of the Initiative, more than 123,000 law enforcement personnel have received some form of VALOR-related training. A critical piece of the VALOR Initiative is to understand the future officer safety training needs.

For more information about the VALOR Officer Safety and Wellness Initiative, please visit: https://bja.ojp.gov/program/valor/overview

New COPS Office Report: Ten Essential Actions to Improve School Safety

August 11, 2020 – The U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) released a new report entitled: “Ten Essential Actions to Improve School Safety: School Safety Working Group Report to the Attorney General”

The COPS Office School Safety Working Group, which is composed of representatives from eight national law enforcement organizations, has identified 10 essential actions that can be taken by schools, school districts, and law enforcement agencies to improve school safety.

Frank Straub, Ph.D., Director of the National Police Foundation’s Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, had the privilege of serving on the School Safety Working Group.

A copy of the report can be found at: http://cops.usdoj.gov/RIC/ric.php?page=detail&id=COPS-W0891

U.S. Senate Law Enforcement Caucus hosts virtual panel discussion on community policing

JULY 31, 2020—The U.S. Senate Law Enforcement Caucus, co-chaired by Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO) and Senator Chris Coons (D-DE), recently hosted a virtual panel discussion centered on the philosophy of community policing, exploring effective community policing policies and programs, the impact that community policing has had on the public, and the role of community policing moving forward.  

The virtual event was attended by a range of law enforcement officers, community leaders, and civil rights organizations from across the country.

The panel was moderated by Karen Amendola, Ph.D., Psychologist and Chief Behavioral Scientist at the National Police Foundation. Panelists included: Chief Greg Mullen (formerly of Charleston, SC, Police Department) of Clemson University (SC), Chief Danny Whiteley of Poplar Bluff (MO), Reverend Dr. Donald Morton of the Complexities of Color Coalition in Wilmington (DE), and Bishop Mark Tolbert, Vice President of the Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners.

To view a recording of the panel, please visit: https://bit.ly/33k6rGF

When Strategies Cause Unintended Harms

By Ivonne Roman (Executive Fellow, National Police Foundation)

Policing is a fast-paced environment as departments are consistently responding to community demands for service and chiefs are consistently responding to crime trends.  As strategies are implemented though, too often, its impacts are assessed based on weekly or monthly comparisons for crime, yet little thought is given to possible blow-back effects, or to the unintended outcomes of strategies—the type of effects that damage relationships with those we serve.  Although a strategy may appear to work at first glance, we must ask ourselves, “Does the strategy cause unintended harms?” and “How can we best measure those harms?”

Misapplication can be malpractice

In February 2015, I was at a police executive meeting where former New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton was speaking to a room full of law enforcement officers and college students gathered at Rutgers–Newark.  Bratton was the featured speaker for the Police Institute’s Distinguished Lecture Series. During his address, he detailed how he used disorder policing strategies, better known as the broken windows theory, to reduce crime in New York City and Los Angeles.  He also warned against the theory’s misapplication, a topic rarely discussed in policing circles.

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Policing, Quo Vadis?

By Chief Cameron S. McLay (Ret.)

It is said that St. Peter was fleeing the City of Rome to escape persecution by the government when he met the resurrected Jesus walking the other way, toward the City. “Quo Vadis Domine?”—Where are you going, Lord?  asked Peter. In reply, Jesus explained he was returning to Rome to be crucified again. His work was not yet done. Jesus’ selfless commitment gave Peter the courage to continue his ministry—his service to humanity. He too ultimately sacrificed himself in the name of service to others.

American policing, Quo Vadis—where are you going?

I understand. You, the police, have become subject of criticism boarding on persecutionDaily, you engage in tens of thousands of acts of service, courage and kindness with little recognition. But, let one of your 900,000 members engage in misconduct, in any one of the tens of thousands of police contacts that occur nationwide and your entire profession is once again subjected to virulent criticism.

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Ransomware and cyberattacks are not going away anytime soon—here is how to protect your agency

By Kevin Fray, Principal Solutions Architect, Mark43, kevin.fray@mark43.com

In 2019, government organizations were the intended targets of nearly two-thirds of all known ransomware attacks in the United States.[1] While many of these events go unreported, at least 70 state and local governments are known to have been attacked last year alone, representing a notable uptick from prior years.[2] Ransomware attacks generally take the form of hackers obtaining access to a network and deploying malware to encrypt the victim’s data; they then charge a ransom in order for the victim to regain access to their data.

These attacks can bring government operations to a standstill, and result in costs to the municipality that range from tens of thousands to tens of millions of dollars to return to full capacity. It is estimated that between April and June of 2019, government victims of ransomware attacks paid an average ransom of over $300,000.[3] However, even when the financial demands were met, the hackers did not always remit control, and the integrity of the system remained compromised.[4]

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National Police Foundation and Baltimore Police Department release reports on community policing and engagement

June 19, 2020—The National Police Foundation (NPF) is pleased to announce the release of two reports presenting the results of focus groups, interviews, and open feedback from Baltimore Police Department (BPD) staff and Baltimore community members on community policing and engagement in the City.

To support the efforts of the City of Baltimore and BPD, in implementation of its consent decree through funding from the Ford Foundation, NPF facilitated focus groups and disseminated an online feedback form to gather perspectives from BPD personnel on the department’s challenges and areas of change needed for enhanced community policing and engagement between November 2018 and January 2019. NPF also partnered with Loyola University Maryland and No Boundaries Coalition to facilitate focus groups and interview sessions and administer an open feedback form to gather community member perceptions of BPD. They also elicited input on their expectations for police service between June 2019 and October 2019.

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Statement on Atlanta Police Shooting of Rayshard Brooks

June 16, 2020—As we struggle to process our thoughts and emotions after viewing yet another video involving a deadly police encounter, we try to understand why this happened again. Without regard to perspectives, our skin color, or whether we are wearing a uniform or not, we must agree that none of us want to see another tragic and painful loss of life and acknowledge that our communities and our country can’t afford another.

We must come together and work together for change. While there are many changes that can and should be made, such a list requires more than a statement such as this can afford, however important the statement is. Instead, we urge all involved to consider what we view as essential for effective and sustainable change:

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National Police Foundation welcomes new Director of Development and Marketing and new Director of Research

The National Police Foundation is pleased to welcome two new directors to its leadership team.

Director of Development and Marketing

Tamara Martin, Director of Development and Marketing

Tamara Martin joined the National Police Foundation (NPF) in May 2020. Tamara previously worked at the University of Maryland, where she directed the Membership and Marketing department and led a complete department revamp and eCRM conversion. She achieved this while simultaneously executing award-winning revenue generating campaigns. She has over 15 years of non-profit management expertise, both nationally and internationally, having worked in and/or overseen development, events, business development, member services and communications functions in a variety of large and small organizations.

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