Archives Erica Richardson

National Police Foundation Board of Directors Chairman Bernard Melekian Receives Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal recipients Evalee Treen (left), retired administrative office professional; and Bernard Melekian (right), retired undersheriff. (Photo: Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office)

The National Police Foundation is pleased to announce Bernard Melekian, Chairman of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, was recently awarded a Distinguished Service Medal by the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office, in recognition of his 40-plus year career in law enforcement and his guidance and leadership during his time at the Sheriff’s Office.

The medal was presented on April 12, 2019, during an annual recognition awards ceremony, where the  Sheriff’s Office recognized a group of individuals and/or units who demonstrated exemplary performance.

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NPF and City of Phoenix to release Phoenix PD Officer-Involved Shooting Study

Media advisory issued by the Phoenix Police Department

PHOENIX — On Friday, April 19, 2019, at 10:15 a.m., Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams with Mayor Kate Gallego and Chairman of the Public Safety & Veterans Subcommittee District 7 Councilman Michael Nowakowski, along with Jim Burch, President of the National Police Foundation (NPF), will hold a press conference at Phoenix Police Headquarters to announce the release of the final report on the study of the 2018 Phoenix Police Officer-Involved Shootings.

A copy of the report, as well as background and supporting documents, may be downloaded by visiting www.phoenix.gov/oisinfo. Our speakers will be available for brief questions following the announcement. Those outlets in attendance may sign up for limited one-on-one time with Chief Williams (must be in attendance to sign up). The conference will be streamed live on the Phoenix Police Facebook page at www.facebook.com/phoenixazpolice.

Background: In May of 2018, Phoenix Police reached the total number of OIS for all of 2017 (21). Proactive steps to examine and address this disturbing spike were begun, to include increased training, releasing a publicly available OIS Data Showcase/Dashboard, and requesting that City Council grant permission to commission a study. The National Police Foundation, an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization was chosen to conduct the study. By the end of 2018, there had been 44 Phoenix Police OIS, 37 of these suspects were armed with firearms; 35 total suspects were injured, and 22 were fatally injured.

“As chief, I am committed to taking each of the National Police Foundation’s recommendations seriously and working through the process to implement them,” said Jeri Williams, Phoenix Police Chief.

Jim Burch, Interim President of the National Police Foundation. Mr. Burch has over 20 years of policing and criminal justice experience at the US Department of Justice, and has served as the Assistant Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms, Acting Director at the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and as Deputy Assistant Attorney General.

Dr. Justin Nix, researcher for this endeavor. Dr. Nix is an Assistant Professor at the School of Criminology & Criminal Justice from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His research centers on policing with emphasis on procedural justice, legitimacy, and officer-involved shootings.

For media inquiries, please contact media@policefoundation.org.

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Update: A copy of the report is now available to view/download on our website here. To view a recording of the press conference, please visit the Phoenix Police Department Facebook page here.

April Policing Updates Newsletter

April 3, 2019 — This month’s newsletter features our police professionalism and public safety accreditation work in Mexico in collaboration with CALEA and INL, two new publications on UAS implementation and Early Intervention System implementation, a new OnPolicing blog, resources for agencies, NPF Policing Fellows spotlight, upcoming events, and more!

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Co-opting the Police: What can be done about “Profiling by Proxy?”

By Sergeant Jeremiah P. Johnson
Darien Police Department, CT

More than 50 years ago, James Q. Wilson noted that, “As the urban poor and the big-city police increasingly come into conflict, it is the patrolman who is on the grinding edge1.” Wilson’s imagery brings to bear an uncomfortable reality that is neither pleasant for police or the community. If police are on the grinding edge, the metaphor begs the question as to whom is pulling the lever.  Police and “the urban poor” (a euphemism for racial and ethnic minorities) are brought into contact through different avenues, not all of which are initiated by the police. It is imperative for police executives to recognize and mitigate the perils of 911-driven complaints that can entangle their officers in the biases of others. Read More & Share

Public Safety Agencies in More than Half of All States in Mexico Sign on to Police Professionalism Grant Under U.S. State Department 

Law enforcement agencies in 21 out of 32 states in Mexico aim to achieve the “gold standard” in public safety accreditation

MEXICO CITY, March 12, 2019 — Law enforcement agencies in more than half of all states in Mexico have officially committed to pursuing international law enforcement accreditation through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA). CALEA was established in 1979 and is a credentialing authority that awards accreditation to public safety agencies in the US, Canada, Barbados and Mexico that demonstrate meeting an established set of professional standards based on industry best practices.

This initiative, made available to law enforcement agencies in Mexico, is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Merida Initiative, with additional training and technical assistance provided by the Police Foundation.

There are currently 50 state, municipal, and federal public safety agencies pursuing or maintaining CALEA accreditation in Mexico, including police departments, public safety training academies, and public safety communication centers. In November of 2018, CALEA inaugurated its first accreditation hearing in Mexico City, where six Mexican law enforcement agencies presented before CALEA’s Board of Commissioners and earned CALEA accreditation. These agencies are required to undergo annual on-line audits and an on-site evaluation by trained CALEA Assessors every four years in order to maintain their accredited status.

“The growing number of Mexican law enforcement agencies interested in pursuing CALEA accreditation demonstrates a commitment to organizational improvement, excellence, and professionalism — not just in one state, but across the entire country of Mexico,” said Jim Burch, the Interim President of the Police Foundation. “We are optimistic that even more Mexican agencies will apply to earn CALEA accreditation, demonstrating significant commitment to professionalism by Mexican law enforcement and new hope for Mexican citizens.”

Law enforcement agencies achieve accreditation following a multi-year self-assessment phase and a meticulous site-based assessment of community engagement, policy, procedures, equipment and facilities by CALEA Assessors. Each agency then goes before CALEA’s Board of Commissioners, which reviews all findings and makes an independent determination if the agency complies with all applicable CALEA standards before conferring accredited status.

With regard to the significance of Mexican law enforcement earning CALEA accreditation, Tobin Bradley, Director of the Merida Initiative office at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico, stated, “Accreditation increases public trust in institutions; it gives citizens confidence that their complaints will be heard, that their police forces will do what they should, and if they don’t – that they will be held accountable.”

CALEA’s Executive Director W. Craig Hartley, Jr. added, “The process of CALEA accreditation is a proven model for success in public safety. CALEA’s partnership with the National Police Foundation and the United States Department of State serves to further assist public safety leaders and practitioners in Mexico to achieve continuous organizational improvement.”

“We are honored to provide technical assistance and guidance to 39 Mexican public safety agencies, including 18 training academies, 11 communications centers, and 10 law enforcement agencies, as they pursue international accreditation through CALEA and we are grateful for the State Department’s critical support,” said Jim Burch, Interim President of the National Police Foundation. “This program has already resulted in the accreditation of multiple agencies across Mexico and has generated interest from dozens of others, demonstrating a strong desire to enhance professionalism and to advance Mexican policing.”

Background:
The Merida Initiativeis a bilateral security cooperation agreement between Mexico and the United States of America. Through nearly ten years of implementation, the Merida Initiative has led to greater cooperation between the United States and Mexico. It provides tangible support to Mexico’s law enforcement and judicial institutions, strengthens border security, and helps to counteract the activities of transnational criminal organizations and the illegal trade in narcotics. To date, through the Mérida Initiative the United States has delivered USD 1.8 billion in equipment, training, and capacity building assistance to the government of Mexico.

The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA®) was created in 1979 as an independent, not-for-profit credentialing authority. The purpose of CALEA’s Accreditation Programs is to improve the delivery of public safety services, primarily by: maintaining a body of standards, developed by public safety practitioners, covering a wide range of up-to-date public safety initiatives; establishing and administering an accreditation process; and recognizing professional excellence. This accreditation program provides public safety agencies an opportunity to voluntarily demonstrate that they meet an established set of professional standards based on industry best practices and approved by an all-volunteer board of commissioners.

The Police Foundationis a U.S.-based, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing policing through innovation and science. For nearly 50 years, the Police Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing, provided training and technical assistance in all aspects of policing, and has led the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement in the U.S. and internationally. For more information on the Police Foundation, please visit www.policefoundation.org (www.fundacionpolicia.org.mx). For media inquiries, please contact media@policefoundation.org.

Averted School Violence “Near Miss” Initiative Featured in Congressional Briefing

From left to right: Dr. Dusty Blakey, Ed.D., Superintendent, Colonial School District, New Castle, DE Jim Accomando, President, National PTA Board of Directors, Fairfield, CT Kristina Alzugaray, Student and SAVE Promise Club National Youth Advisory Board Member, Cutler Bay High School, Cutler Bay, FL Moderator: Mark Barden, Parent and Managing Director, Sandy Hook Promise, Newtown, CT Mark O’Neill: Center Roads Solutions Frank Straub, Ph.D., Director, Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, The Police Foundation, Battle Creek, MI

March 8, 2019 — Dr. Frank Straub, Director of Strategic Studies and the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies at the National Police Foundation, participated in the Sandy Hook Promise and AASA (The School Superintendents Association) Congressional Briefing today on “Keeping Students Safe: Proven Programs to Prevent School Violence.”

Dr. Straub, who oversees the National Police Foundation’s Averted School Violence Database, joined four other panelists (Mark Barden, Parent and Managing Director, Sandy Hook Promise; Jim Accomando, President, National PTA; Dr. Dusty Blakey, Superintendent, Colonial School District, New Castle, Delaware; Kristina Alguzaray, Student, Cutler Bay High School, Cutler Bay, FL) to speak to a room full of Congressional Staffers, advocacy organizations in the education, mental health and law enforcement field, and the press in order to educate senior-level Congressional staff on violence prevention programming, examples from education and law enforcement officials on school violence prevention, and perspectives from students and administrators on proven methods for student safety.

Dr. Frank Straub was asked several key questions relating to school safety based on data collected through the National Police Foundation’s Averted School Violence Database.

From your research on averted school violence, what is the most surprising thing you have learned as it relates to school shootings?

“I think there is a very important theme that emerged from our research – we have to spend more time on the prevention piece of the discussion. By that I mean we have to focus on developing supportive and resilient cultures in school environments that set- up all students for success. Within that context we have to put in place thoughtful policies and strategies to identify students who are becoming disenfranchised and/or isolated from their peers and adult role models – either because of bullying and other behaviors that adversely effect students who are ‘different’ or because of personal, family or other challenges that are causing them to withdraw.

We need to increase funding for mental health practitioners in school environments; school resource officer mental health/crisis intervention training that is specific to the social/emotional/intellectual developmental stages of the student populations they serve; greater emphasis on adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and trauma-informed approaches; encouraging supportive social-emotional and normative learning environments.

Sometimes our work needs to be about returning to the basics of education – ensuring that allstudents have the opportunities they need for success and engaging those students who are becoming isolated and disconnected.”

Based on your research, what policy recommendations would you make to Congress in this area?

“I think it is important for Congress to support holistic approaches to prevention, response and recovery. Local and state-level anonymous reporting systems are invaluable to protecting our children and should be linked to the Averted School Violence Database to create a national ‘public health’ surveillance system to provide solid data to policy makers, educators, law enforcement, mental health providers and the public on what works to protect our children.”

For more information on the the Averted School Violence initiative, please visit the ASV website.

Major County Sheriffs of America Selects National Police Foundation as Independent Research Partner

 

The National Police Foundation is very pleased to announce a new partnership with the Major County Sheriffs of America (MCSA) to serve as MCSA’s research partner. Our goal is to provide independent and objective research on a variety of issues, translational services, policy analysis, technology assessments and reviews, evaluations, and the development of promising and evidence-based resources for the MCSA. This work will be done in support of MCSA’s mission and in recognition of their leading role in American policing.

The National Police Foundation’s mission is to advance policing through innovation and science. We are the oldest nationally-known, nonprofit (501c3), nonpartisan, and non-membership-driven organization dedicated to improving America’s most noble profession – policing. Our work promotes research and innovation to reduce and prevent violent crime, improve officer safety and wellness, advance police organizations, and promote science and evidence-based practices in policing.

The Major County Sheriffs of America (MCSA) is a professional law enforcement association of elected sheriffs representing counties or parishes with 500,000 population or more. They are dedicated to preserving the highest integrity in law enforcement and the elected Office of the Sheriff. Their membership represents over 100 million Americans. MCSA works to promote a greater understanding of law enforcement strategies to address futures problems and identify law enforcement challenges facing their members. MCSA is  committed to advancing legislative issues that will enhance the safety of communities, and also aggressively pursues the development of innovative education along with prevention and enforcement strategies and programs.

Expand and Integrate Data 101

 

Expand and Integrate Law Enforcement Relevant Data 101: A How To Guide for Investigators and Analysts

 

October 17, 2018

Presented by Jamie Roush, Chief Executive Officer of CRH Crime Analysis Consulting, Inc.

Data exists in a multitude of locations and formats all throughout law enforcement agencies. While most agencies rely heavily on Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) and Records Management Systems (RMS), there are other data sources within a law enforcement agencies, external law enforcement agencies and government entities and corporations which are relevant and can be utilized in crime fighting efforts. This webinar will provide concrete examples of such data types and methods of and barriers to integration.

What You Will Learn:

  • Acquire an understanding of internal and external law enforcement, government and commercial data sources relevant to law enforcement investigations and crime fighting efforts.
  • Obtain practical knowledge of methods of integrating such data with your organization’s existing data systems.
  • Learn about potential barriers to acquiring and integrating data and suggested tips to assist in developing and fostering successful data partnerships.

About the Speaker:

Ms. Jamie Roush is the Chief Executive Officer of CRH Crime Analysis Consulting, Inc., a partnership corporation which consults for law enforcement agencies on technology, data, analysis and its use in law enforcement operations. She has over 15 years of collective law enforcement experience including a ten-plus year career with the Jacksonville (FL) Sheriff’s Office commencing as the Crime Analysis Unit Manager where she commanded a unit of 20 public safety/crime analysts and supervisors. Ms. Roush is a recognized leader in the field of crime and intelligence analysis, serving as consultant for organizations supporting numerous federal law enforcement programs. She is a frequent speaker at law enforcement conferences and an author in law enforcement publications on crime analysis. She is a member of the George Mason University Evidence-Based Policing Hall of Fame for her commitment to using research and data analysis to improve police operations while in Jacksonville. She is an associate member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts (IACA). Ms. Roush holds a Master of Science in Social Science and a Bachelor of Arts in Geography from The Florida State University.

National Police Foundation Launches Center for Mass Violence Response Studies Website

February 7, 2019, WASHINGTON — To further its mission to advance public safety through innovation and science, the National Police Foundation — a non-partisan and non-profit research organization — recently launched the Center for Mass Violence Response Studieswebsite. The Center was originally established in July of 2018 and now has its own designated website, where public and school safety officials, government and community leaders, and law enforcement can access important research, reports, and other information collected and produced by the National Police Foundation to help inform policy and procedure relating to the prevention, response, and recovery from mass violence. The mission of the Center is to serve as an innovation incubator that builds on the Foundation’s expertise and provides a platform to bring persons and organizations together that are dedicated to preventing extremism and mass violence and improving the response and recovery from these tragic events.

During the last decade, persons motivated by a range of ideological beliefs and individual factors have engaged in acts of mass violence targeting innocent civilians in communities across the United States. Mass violence attacks, incidents in which multiple persons are killed or injured, have increased in frequency and lethality. While incidents of mass violence, including terrorist events and school shootings, remain relatively infrequent, their effects are devastating for the survivors, families of victims, communities, first responders and the country. For public safety officials, these incidents represent crises that challenge emergency response protocols and demand actionable research to inform policies and practices.

The Center for Mass Violence Response Studies leverages the National Police Foundation’s expertise and its unique position as an independent organization to advise federal, state, and local public safety officials regarding the prevention, response and recovery from mass violence events. The Center features research in five key areas: countering violence and extremism, averted school violence, critical incident reviews, first responder safety & wellness, and a state-by-state legislative review of school safety standards and legislation. The Center conducts objective policy-relevant research, critical incident reviews, and provides training and technical assistance to inform strategic thinking, expand knowledge, and advance public safety policies and practices.

“Public safety, law enforcement, policy makers and government leaders can gain valuable insights from research, data, and case studies that illuminate best practices and critical focus areas to enhance the prevention, response and recovery from mass violence incidents,” said Jim Burch, Interim President of the National Police Foundation. “Drawing from key research studies and critical incident reviews, the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies will provide valuable resources to agencies responsible for ensuring public safety in communities across the U.S. and internationally.”

The Foundation has conducted critical incident reviews of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, Kalamazoo shootings, and the Pulse Night Club attack. It is currently conducting a comprehensive review of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. In 2015, with funding from the National Institute of Justice and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, the National Police Foundation developed and administers the Averted School Violence database. The Foundation also conducted a state by state review of school facility and building safety and security standards and is leading a Department of Homeland Security countering extremism and violence project in the Boston area.

Dr. Frank Straub is the Director of the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies and oversees the Foundation’s public safety, terrorism, school safety and youth violence initiatives.

Established in 1970, the National Police Foundation is a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science. For nearly 50 years, the Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing and is leading the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement. The Foundation is currently working with hundreds of police agencies nationwide, as well as internationally, providing research and translation, training, technical assistance, and modern technology implementation. The Foundation is a leader in officer safety and wellness, community policing, open-data, investigations, and law-enforcement technology. The Foundation’s main goal is to improve the way police do their work and the delivery of police services, in order to benefit officers and the communities they serve, as well as reduce crime.

 

For media inquiries, please contact Dr. Frank Straub, Director of the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, by email at media@policefoundation.org or by phone at 202-833-1460.

 

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