Archives Erica Richardson

Ransomware and cyberattacks are not going away anytime soon—here is how to protect your agency

By Kevin Fray, Principal Solutions Architect, Mark43, kevin.fray@mark43.com

In 2019, government organizations were the intended targets of nearly two-thirds of all known ransomware attacks in the United States.[1] While many of these events go unreported, at least 70 state and local governments are known to have been attacked last year alone, representing a notable uptick from prior years.[2] Ransomware attacks generally take the form of hackers obtaining access to a network and deploying malware to encrypt the victim’s data; they then charge a ransom in order for the victim to regain access to their data.

These attacks can bring government operations to a standstill, and result in costs to the municipality that range from tens of thousands to tens of millions of dollars to return to full capacity. It is estimated that between April and June of 2019, government victims of ransomware attacks paid an average ransom of over $300,000.[3] However, even when the financial demands were met, the hackers did not always remit control, and the integrity of the system remained compromised.[4]

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National Police Foundation and Baltimore Police Department release reports on community policing and engagement

June 19, 2020—The National Police Foundation (NPF) is pleased to announce the release of two reports presenting the results of focus groups, interviews, and open feedback from Baltimore Police Department (BPD) staff and Baltimore community members on community policing and engagement in the City.

To support the efforts of the City of Baltimore and BPD, in implementation of its consent decree through funding from the Ford Foundation, NPF facilitated focus groups and disseminated an online feedback form to gather perspectives from BPD personnel on the department’s challenges and areas of change needed for enhanced community policing and engagement between November 2018 and January 2019. NPF also partnered with Loyola University Maryland and No Boundaries Coalition to facilitate focus groups and interview sessions and administer an open feedback form to gather community member perceptions of BPD. They also elicited input on their expectations for police service between June 2019 and October 2019.

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Statement on Atlanta Police Shooting of Rayshard Brooks

June 16, 2020—As we struggle to process our thoughts and emotions after viewing yet another video involving a deadly police encounter, we try to understand why this happened again. Without regard to perspectives, our skin color, or whether we are wearing a uniform or not, we must agree that none of us want to see another tragic and painful loss of life and acknowledge that our communities and our country can’t afford another.

We must come together and work together for change. While there are many changes that can and should be made, such a list requires more than a statement such as this can afford, however important the statement is. Instead, we urge all involved to consider what we view as essential for effective and sustainable change:

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National Police Foundation welcomes new Director of Development and Marketing and new Director of Research

The National Police Foundation is pleased to welcome two new directors to its leadership team.

Director of Development and Marketing

Tamara Martin, Director of Development and Marketing

Tamara Martin joined the National Police Foundation (NPF) in May 2020. Tamara previously worked at the University of Maryland, where she directed the Membership and Marketing department and led a complete department revamp and eCRM conversion. She achieved this while simultaneously executing award-winning revenue generating campaigns. She has over 15 years of non-profit management expertise, both nationally and internationally, having worked in and/or overseen development, events, business development, member services and communications functions in a variety of large and small organizations.

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National Police Foundation launches new Science and Innovation livestream series

June 12, 2020—The National Police Foundation (NPF) is pleased to announce a new Science and Innovation online livestream broadcast series.

The series is designed to reflect NPF’s mission as an organization—advancing policing through innovation and science. The goal is to actively bring research into the conversation and apply it to everyday management and reform conversations. These conversations will feature perspectives from practitioners and academics and will dive deeper into scientific or technical findings or innovations that may help police leaders in guiding and managing the agency, including the development of new policies and procedures, help elected officials and community members gain a deeper insight into police organizations and policing overall, and to expand our knowledge collectively.

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Defense Logistics Agency 1033 Program: Analysis of 2019-2020 Transfers to States for Law Enforcement Use

The National Police Foundation has received inquiries on the 1033 Program and how it is used by law enforcement. In responding to these requests, the Foundation accessed the 1033 Program data and analyzed transfers from June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020. While some agencies and states continue to receive military equipment such as mine resistant vehicles, rifles and associated parts, the vast majority of equipment transferred during this period consists of clothing, personal protective equipment such as gloves and facemasks, and basic infrastructure needs such as wiring, tools, generators, etc. States and local communities save hundreds of thousands of dollars through the program. The Foundation encourages those considering policy changes to examine the data and respond in ways that don’t diminish the appropriate uses and value that states and local communities receive.

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Statement from National Police Foundation on Use-of-Force Incident in Minneapolis

May 27, 2020 (via The Washington Post)—The video we’ve all now seen is distressing and hard for anyone to watch. It’s also hard for any of us to even begin to understand how something like that could occur and to occur in such a seemingly oblivious way. We cannot accept it or excuse it. The Chief’s decision is certainly understandable, particularly in the sense that he would have access to all of the information that many of us do not have.

As we work with law enforcement officers and leaders across the U.S. and beyond, we have the privilege of witnessing the dedication and commitment to service, integrity, fairness and respect that countless officers have and demonstrate each and every day, even in the face of adversity and, at times, confrontation. This video and the behaviors observed do not represent them well. Instead, these actions (and inaction) jeopardize the gains that have been made through the sacrifices and courage of many.

While the full investigation may reveal additional details and facts that are unknown to most of us today, we should all come together in agreement that the glimpse we have into this encounter is not consistent with the oath that officers take or the courage and integrity that the vast majority display each and every day.

National Police Foundation COVID-19 First Responder Grant Program Privacy Policy

This Privacy Policy governs the manner in which the Police Foundation, d.b.a. National Police Foundation, collects, uses, maintains and discloses information in connection with its COVID-19 grant program. With respect to use of the Police Foundation’s website, privacy matters are governed by the policy available at https://www.policefoundation.org/privacy-policy/.

Personal identification information

In administering the grant program, we may collect personal identification information from applicants and other visitors to the related websites (Users) in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, when Users visit our site, fill out a form, or apply for a grant. In particular, applicants will be asked for a wide range of personal identification information in order to permit our assessment of their applications. We will collect personal identification information from Users only if they voluntarily submit such information to us. Users can refuse to supply personally identification information, except that it may prevent them from being considered for a grant.

How we use collected information

Police Foundation may collect and use User’s personal information for the following purposes:

To evaluate grant application – With respect to information submitted on or in connection with a grant application, we will use the information to evaluate the application and make a decision as to whether to award a grant.

To evaluate grant program – We will use personal information to assess the grant program, including to consider potential changes to the program, and to inform the creation of any future related programs.

To contact applicants for additional information or for other purposes – We may use the email address of applicants and other information to contact them to request additional information in connection with their applications or for other purposes related to the program.

To improve customer service – Information you provide helps us respond to your customer service requests and support needs more efficiently.

To improve our Site – We may use feedback you provide to improve our products and services.

To send periodic emails – We may use the email address to respond to their inquiries, questions, and/or other requests. If User decides to opt-in to future emails, they may receive emails that may include news, updates, related product or service information, etc. If at any time the User would like to unsubscribe from receiving future emails, we include detailed unsubscribe instructions at the bottom of each email or User may contact us via our Site.

To raise awareness of issues related to COVID-19 – We may use aggregated or non-identifiable information from Users to share information with the public about the grant program and related issues.

Sharing your personal information

We may share aggregated personal information with organizations who are funding the grant program. Similarly, we may share aggregated personal information with the public. We also may share non-identifiable information with funders or the public in order to illustrate the scope and impact of the grant program.

We may use third party service providers to help us operate our business and the Site or administer activities on our behalf, such as sending out newsletters or surveys. We may share your information with these third parties for those limited purposes provided that you have given us your permission. We will not sell, rent, share, or disclose your email address or use it for any other purpose than what you have indicated.

How we protect your information

We adopt appropriate data collection, storage and processing practices and security measures to protect against unauthorized access, alteration, disclosure or destruction of your personal information, username, password, transaction information and data stored on our Site.

Non-personal identification information

We may collect non-personal identification information about Users whenever they interact with our Site. Non-personal identification information may include the browser name, the type of computer and technical information about Users means of connection to our Site, such as the operating system and the Internet service providers utilized and other similar information.

Web browser cookies

Our Site may use “cookies” to enhance User experience. User’s web browser places cookies on their hard drive for record-keeping purposes and sometimes to track information about them. User may choose to set their web browser to refuse cookies, or to alert you when cookies are being sent. If they do so, note that some parts of the Site may not function properly.

Third party websites

Users may find advertising or other content on our Site that links to the sites and services of our partners, suppliers, advertisers, sponsors, licensors and other third parties. We do not control the content or links that appear on these sites and are not responsible for the practices employed by websites linked to or from our Site. In addition, these sites or services, including their content and links, may be constantly changing. These sites and services may have their own privacy policies and customer service policies. Browsing and interaction on any other website, including websites which have a link to our Site, is subject to that website’s own terms and policies.

Changes to this privacy policy

Police Foundation has the discretion to update this privacy policy at any time. When we do, we will revise the updated date at the bottom of this page. We encourage Users to frequently check this page for any changes to stay informed about how we are helping to protect the personal information we collect. You acknowledge and agree that it is your responsibility to review this privacy policy periodically and become aware of modifications.

Your acceptance of these terms

By submitting an application or otherwise using this Site, you signify your acceptance of this policy. If you do not agree to this policy, please do not use our Site. Your continued use of the Site following the posting of changes to this policy will be deemed your acceptance of those changes.

Contacting us

If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, the practices of this site, or your dealings with this site, please contact us at:

Police Foundation
2550 S. Clark Street, Suite 1130
Arlington, Virginia 22202
(202) 833-1460
www.policefoundation.org

Assessing the impact of COVID-19 and community responses on traffic crashes and fatalities

May 19, 2020—In response to the pandemic, safety measures such as staying at home and social distancing have become parts of everyday life. As an organization that strives to bring data and science into public safety discussions, we are curious about the indirect effects that safety measures have on public safety as we navigate the new normal.

The National Police Foundation is examining traffic crashes and fatalities from an initial sample of five states: Florida, Iowa, Ohio, Massachusetts, and Missouri. While the number of traffic and fatal crashes decreased across the states, fatality rates increased across each state during April and in parts of March compared to 2019 data. These data may suggest a probable increase in behaviors that should cause concern among policymakers, including what appears to be an increase in excessive speed and reckless driving among motorists.

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Police data behind the pandemic response: policing through COVID-19

By Andrew Vaught (Managing Director, Data Driven Strategies Division, Baltimore Police Department) and Joyce Iwashita (Project Associate, National Police Foundation)

Despite the challenges that exposures to the coronavirus (COVID-19) present to police operations, agencies around the nation continue to respond to public safety issues in our communities. According to the National Police Foundation’s (NPF’s) Law Enforcement Impact Dashboard, thousands of law enforcement officers across the country have been exposed to COVID-19. As members continue to respond to the call to serve and protect, data collection and analysis is helping the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) make informed decisions about staffing and resource allocation that ultimately affects the safety of our members and the level of service we provide to our community. At the same time, our agency has an eye on ways that this data could help us and our federal, state, and local partners plan and prepare for the next wave of COVID-19 or the next pandemic we are faced with.

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