Archives Erica Richardson

Utilizing Data and Science to Reduce Serious Injury and Fatality Crashes on Rural Roadways

By Captain Ken Clary
Iowa State Patrol

This article was reprinted from Translational Criminology Magazine (Fall, 2018), with the permission of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

As commanders within state police and patrol organizations, we are charged with protecting the citizenry traveling on our roadways. Although some might view violations of traffic laws as lesser offenses, those infractions can often lead to death and/ or serious injury if not corrected. In 2016, a total of 37,461 people lost their lives on U.S. roadways,1 while, in comparison, 16,250 people were reported by the FBI’s Uniformed Crime Report as murdered that same year. Traffic crashes result in an enormous loss of life annually and are consistently a leading cause of nonhealth related deaths in the United States. Read More & Share

National Police Foundation and Mark43 Announce Officer Safety Partnership with the Law Enforcement Officer Near Miss Initiative

October 8, 2018

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–As protecting our nation’s law enforcement officers remains paramount, the National Police Foundation and Mark43 are announcing a new partnership in support of the Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss initiative. The new partnership will help officers and agencies more easily and efficiently share “near misses” – situations where officers were almost seriously injured or killed. This partnership will improve safety for officers who experience near misses – a common occurrence within law enforcement, where officers put their lives on the line every day.

Near misses are usually very similar in characteristics to situations in which law enforcement officers were seriously injured or killed, so increasing the systematic reporting and analysis of these events will enable law enforcement to more proactively identify risks to officer safety and take the necessary action to prevent tragedy.

Through the partnership, Mark43 will now offer its customers the ability to seamlessly integrate near-miss reporting into their existing records management system (RMS) to enable officers and supervisors to, at the simple click of a button, automatically submit anonymized data to the LEO Near Miss reporting system (www.LEOnearmiss.org). This efficiency ensures that data critical to improving officer safety is systematically reported, captured, and analyzed, while also acknowledging the multitude of competing priorities and time constraints our officers face on a daily basis. The Mark43 integration also ensures that each participating agency has access to real-time data on the risks its officers are encountering, bolstering the agency’s capability to quickly and proactively address emerging threats to officer safety.

“This outstanding partnership will make the LEO Near Miss initiative far more effective and will allow us to make significant gains in officer safety by improving participation and reporting,” said Chief Jim Bueermann (Ret.), President of the National Police Foundation. Chief Richard Myers (Ret.), Executive Director of the Major Cities Chiefs Association, notes, “We applaud this new officer safety partnership that will create lessons learned from lessons that are ordinarily only observed. This development will support continuous improvement in policing – something we must embrace and commit to in order to continue to advance policing, protect our officers, and serve our community members.”

“This outstanding partnership will make the LEO Near Miss initiative far more effective and will allow us to make significant gains in officer safety by improving participation and reporting,” — Chief Jim Bueermann (Ret.), President of the NPF.

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“We are continuously innovating our technology to best meet the needs of the brave men and women who serve and protect us every day,” said Scott Crouch, Mark43 Co-Founder and CEO. “It was a privilege for our team to work alongside the National Police Foundation to develop this integration. With a simplified near-miss reporting process, officers will be able to help prevent future incidents without ever leaving the Mark43 platform.”

The Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss Reporting System is managed by the National Police Foundation, with funding support from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, in partnership with eight other law enforcement organizations like Below 100, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, the Major Cities Chiefs Association, and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. For more information about how your agency can become involved in this critical officer safety initiative, please visit www.LEOnearmiss.org. Attendees at the IACP Annual Conference & Expo (October 6-9) in Orlando, Florida can also visit Mark43’s booth #1829 to learn more.

About the National Police Foundation:

The National Police Foundation is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing policing through innovation and science. For over 45 years, the Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing and has led the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement.

About Mark43:

Mark43 is the modern platform built for wherever your service takes you. With cloud-native, intuitive software designed to let you focus on what matters most, Mark43 gives agencies a technology foundation to build from — smart, open, and extensible — growing and innovating with you as your needs evolve. Developed by a team that spans five offices in North America, Mark43 is proven, tested, and supported in over 60 public safety agencies of all sizes. For more information, visit www.mark43.com.

Contacts
National Police Foundation
James Burch, Executive Vice President
202-833-1460
jburch@policefoundation.org

or

Mark43, Inc.
212-651-9154
press@mark43.com

Police Foundation Announces New Name

The Police Foundation will be rebranding itself as the National Police Foundation.

October 5, 2018

WASHINGTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Today, after nearly 50 years, the Police Foundation is pleased to announce it will be rebranding itself as the National Police Foundation. You’ll soon see the new name and look in public, such as the Foundation’s website, social media, and conferences. You’ll also see it in written publications, such as reports, essays, and press releases. The National Police Foundation believes the new name and look better represents and matches what it has grown to become over the past 48 years: a national, non-profit organization committed to advancing democratic policing through innovation and science.

“We are proud of the work we do with agencies across the country, as well as internationally. Our goal with rebranding is to make clear our national focus & commitment to support law enforcement officers.” – NPF President Chief (Ret.) Jim Bueermann

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Since the Foundation’s founding in 1970, its name has been the Police Foundation; however, it was not the only Police Foundation using that name. There are now many, many local police foundations, none of which are affiliated with the NPF.

“We are unique in our independence, our work, and our people,” says National Police Foundation President, Chief (Ret.) Jim Bueermann. “We feel it is important to make the distinction that we are an independent, national research organization, proud of the work we do with agencies across the country, as well as internationally. Our goal is to make clear our national focus and our commitment to support law enforcement officers and agencies by advancing policing as America’s most noble profession.”

The new name was approved by the Foundation’s Board of Directors, led by Chairman Bernard Melekian, who has nearly 40 years of law enforcement experience and understands the importance of branding. Melekian, who is the current Assistant County Executive Officer over Public Safety for Santa Barbara County, CA, has previously served as the Undersheriff for Santa Barbara, Police Chief for the city of Pasadena, an officer with the Santa Monica Police Department, the Director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), and a member of the United States Army and Coast Guard Reserves.

“These rebranding changes are not just important to us, but to law enforcement agencies,” says Melekian. “By branding ourselves as the National Police Foundation we hope more policing organizations, policy makers and community members will recognize our name and know that we are here to serve them.”

For more information, please visit the National Police Foundation website. For media inquiries, please contact Erica Richardson, Communications Specialist at the National Police Foundation, at erichardson@policefoundation.org or at 202-833-1460.


Contacts

National Police Foundation
Erica Richardson, 202-833-1460
Communications Specialist
erichardson@policefoundation.org

National Police Foundation to Attend International Summit in India on Countering Violence and Extremism

The National Police Foundation and From India with Love, an initiative of the International Association for Human Values, to collaborate and explore opportunities to counter violence and extremism through Ghandi’s principals of nonviolence and compassion.

MUMBAI, India–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Dr. Frank Straub, Director of Center for Mass Violence Response Studies at the National Police Foundation, and Chief (Ret.) Dean Esserman, Senior Counselor at the National Police Foundation, will travel to India to attend a global summit, organized by Mandar Apte, the Founder and Executive Director of From India with Love, on countering violence and extremism.

Our participation in the world summit and collaboration with From India with Love will create new opportunities to work with police leaders to identify innovative responses to violence & extremism. #NonViolenceSummit2018

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The international summit will bring together police officials, political and community leaders from across the United States and India to study Mahatma Ghandi’s principles of nonviolence. The summit coincides with the 149thanniversary of Ghandi’s birth and a year of celebration and reflection in India.

At the summit, the National Police Foundation, through its recently formed Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, will collaborate with From India with Love, to identify opportunities to reduce violence and improve policing through India’s ancient culture and the wisdom of nonviolence and compassion.

“The collaboration we are developing with From India with Love presents a unique and important opportunity to explore Ghandi’s principles of nonviolence and work with police and community leaders to counter violence and extremism,” said Chief (Ret.) Jim Bueermann, President of the National Police Foundation. “We continue to collaborate with law enforcement leaders in the United States and abroad, including Mexico, Canada and beyond to share ideas to advance policing and safety through science and innovation. We believe that our participation in the world summit and collaboration with From India with Love will create new opportunities to work with law enforcement leaders and to draw from their unique perspectives to identify responses to violence and extremism.”

The Center for Mass Violence Response Studies (CMVRS) draws on the National Police Foundation’s knowledge and experience to provide objective, thorough and actionable research; training; and, technical assistance regarding the prevention, response and recovery from mass violence events.

“As evidenced by this week’s attacks in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Maryland, we must endeavor to identify innovative and collaborative responses to the vexing challenge of mass violence,” said Dr. Frank Straub, Director of CMVRS. “Participation in the Summit presents a unique opportunity to learn from our international colleagues and to identify responses to violence and extremism built on the principals of non-violence and compassion.”

Ultimately, the two groups hope to strengthen connections between U.S. law enforcement and the From India with Love initiative through research and practice as they relate to preventing, responding and recovering from mass violence events.

Established in 1970, the National Police Foundation is a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science. For nearly 50 years, the Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing and is leading the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement. The Foundation is currently working with hundreds of police agencies nationwide, as well as internationally, providing research and translation, training, technical assistance, and modern technology implementation.

From India with Love, an initiative of the International Association for Human Values, is a social advocacy group whose mission is to support leaders to reinvigorate the conversation about nonviolence in America from inspiration to implementation. The group offers customized leadership development programs for civic leaders to experience and study India’s ancient culture and wisdom of nonviolence and supports leaders to design solutions that will promote safer and more peaceful communities & neighborhoods. The group was founded by Mandar Apte after producing a documentary film about victims of violence from across America who embarked on a journey to India, inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who had also visited India to study nonviolence.

For media inquiries, please contact Dr. Frank Straub, Director of Center for Mass Violence Response Studies at the National Police Foundation, at fstraub@policefoundation.org or at 202-833-1460.

Enhanced Interviewing Techniques to Improve Memory Recall

By Lieutenant Jason Potts
Vallejo Police Department, CA

What Happened? Who did it? And, where are they now – simple enough, right? Typical questions that police officers and investigators want answered. But all too often, we attempt to rush and control an interview by asking close-ended questions. This drive for expediency can unintentionally reinforce the victim’s sense of inadequacy, frustrate and confuse them, give off the perception they are not believed, and even re-victimize. Research shows that stress and fear can cause memory alterations and limitations 4. However, cognitive interviewing techniques can mitigate these effects, thus providing a more thorough account of the traumatic event. Cognitive interviewing frames questions to obtain more accurate information and details while simultaneously increasing law enforcement legitimacy in the eyes of the victim. According to several studies, cognitive interviewing elicited between 25% and 40% more statements in the cognitive interviewing groups (intervention) than the traditional methods or business as usual groups (control)8, 4. Read More & Share

Police Foundation Launches New Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Public Safety

New Police Foundation Center provides information and resources for law enforcement and communities on the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in public safety

WASHINGTON — Ensuring the safety of the public is a core mission for all professional law enforcement agencies. In pursuit of this mission, law enforcement leverages many different types of tools, including new and emerging technologies. One of these latest technologies is the small-unmanned aircraft system (sUAS).

The Police Foundation is launching a new Center for law enforcement agencies considering the use of small unmanned aircraft systems. As sUAS technology continues to advance and its use becomes increasingly widespread, the goal of the Police Foundation Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Public Safety is to help law enforcement navigate the equally important community policing aspects of adopting the technology, including community concerns related to privacy and civil rights, transparency and accountability, the development of policy and procedure, and operational safety. We conduct scientific research to examine the real-world challenges of policing and public safety, and work closely with policy staff in the translation of scientific findings and development of evidence-based recommendations for the field.

The website is intended as a resource to help law enforcement agencies make an informed decision on whether to acquire sUAS, and if they do, how to develop policies and procedures that will help garner public support, avoid pitfalls, and build community trust. The website is also intended to provide insight for the public on the advantages of sUAS for public safety, and the many considerations that go into sUAS program implementation.

While this type of technology has significant potential to improve operational efficiency as well as officer and community safety, there are understandable and legitimate concerns about privacy risks. To address these concerns and to improve sUAS programs, law enforcement agencies considering adopting sUAS technology are encouraged to follow the principles of community policing in their adoption and to engage their communities early on in the decision to implement a program.

“sUAS technologies provide law enforcement agencies with unique capabilities for rapid, safe, economical and effective responses to a wide variety of public safety tactical challenges,” said Jim Bueermann, President of the Police Foundation and former Chief of Police in Redlands, California. “Harnessing these capabilities requires not only the skills to operate the technology, but the input and understanding of the community and a pledge to operate the technology in a transparent manner. Taking the time to engage the community, address concerns and gain input from the community is exactly what community policing is all about.”

“Harnessing UAS capabilities requires not only the skills to operate the technology, but the input and understanding of the community and a pledge to operate the technology in a transparent manner.” – @PoliceFound President Jim Bueermann on #PFUASCenter

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The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, supported the development of this website and numerous other resources including an infographic, Five Things You Need to Know about sUAS in Law Enforcement publication, and guidebook.

Established in 1970, the Police Foundation is a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science. For 48 years, the Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing and is leading the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement. The Foundation is currently working with hundreds of police agencies nationwide, as well as internationally, providing research and translation, training, technical assistance, and modern technology implementation. The Foundation is a leader in officer safety and wellness, community policing, open-data, investigations, and law-enforcement technology. The Foundation’s main goal is to improve the way police do their work and the delivery of police services, in order to benefit officers and the communities they serve, as well as reduce crime.

For media-related questions and inquiries related to this website, the Center and the Police Foundation’s sUAS work, please contact James Burch, Executive Vice President, at jburch@policefoundation.org or at 202-833-1460. For non-media questions and inquiries, please contact Maria Valdovinos, Senior Research Associate, at mvaldovinos@policefoundation.org. You may also visit the Police Foundation website at www.policefoundation.org for more information.

Police Foundation Concludes 5-year Study on “Near Repeat” Burglary Prevention Strategies

WASHINGTON, D.C., July 24, 2018 — The Police Foundation recently concluded a research study examining the phenomenon of near-repeat burglary patterns — which suggests that once a burglary occurs on a street, the homes on that street and on nearby streets are at a much higher risk of being burglarized over a relatively short time period (usually the next one to two weeks) — and to use the knowledge surrounding near repeat burglaries to develop and test a crime prevention strategy for police departments and communities to see if the patterns could be interrupted.

With funding from the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, the Police Foundation conducted the study in two police departments — Redlands, CA, and Baltimore County, MD, in cooperation with the two principal investigators: Dr. Elizabeth Groff from Temple University and Dr. Travis Taniguchi of RTI International.

The research team sought to determine if knowledge about near repeat patterns of burglary can actually be used for crime prevention purposes. Within this framework, the Foundation attempted to determine if raising awareness about crime issues and crime prevention techniques amongst residents in the vicinity of the primary  burglary locations could further reduce burglary in the area.

The project was designed to test whether quickly notifying community residents that they are at an increased risk for a burglary and sending patrol, auxiliary officers, and/or volunteers to provide residents with burglary prevention tips could interrupt the phenomena of near repeat burglaries.

The Police Foundation recently published the results of the study, including a “5 Things You Need to Know” document, research summary, strategy brief, and a technical report. These resources and other authored reports can be found by visiting the Police Foundation website or by clicking here.

Police Foundation Launches Law Enforcement Alexa Skills Quiz!


July 20, 2018, WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Police Foundation — a national, non-profit, independent, non-partisan, research organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science — is pleased to announce it recently launched its very own Amazon Alexa Skills Quiz, a cloud-based, voice-activated quiz.

“How Well Do You Know 5-O?” is a short 10-question multiple-choice quiz to test your knowledge about police officers in America (sometimes referred to in slang as “5-O” or “Five-Oh”) and the work they do. All questions are based on facts and data from national research and statistics that cover topics including average police salaries, hiring requirements, assaults and line of duty deaths, use of force, and body worn cameras.

The Police Foundation developed the quiz in an effort to improve education on law enforcement by providing factual information in a fun and interactive format that can be easily accessed.

“There is, particularly amongst the general public, uncertainty about various topics in law enforcement,” said Jim Bueermann, Police Foundation President. “That inspired us to create a police-related quiz using the Amazon Alexa platform.”

The Police Foundation is encouraging community members, friends, and family to gather around their Amazon Echo or other Alexa-enabled devices and ask Alexa how much they know about the 5-O. The Foundation also announced a social media contest in which five winners will be randomly selected to receive an exclusive custom-made Police Foundation 5-O T-Shirt. Details about the contest can be found here.

“Our goal is to share information based on research and facts, not opinions, with the public to enhance education around law enforcement in America, but in a more fun and interactive way.”

Individuals who want to take the quiz need to sign in to their Amazon account and enable the quiz through the Amazon Alexa app or website. Detailed instructions can be found here.

For media inquiries, please contact Erica Richardson at erichardson@policefoundation.org.

Police Foundation Director of Strategic Studies, Chief (Ret.) Frank Straub, Ph.D., Delivers Keynote Address at Campus Safety Conference East 2018

Chief (Ret.) Frank Straub, Ph.D., of the Police Foundation, delivers the keynote address at the Campus Safety Conference East. (Photo by: Police Foundation)

Hundreds of school administrators and public safety officials, including law enforcement and security professionals, convene for a 2-day conference to discuss solutions to campus safety. 

July 19, 2018, WASHINGTON, D.C. – In a speech titled, “Ripples of Hope: Building Multi-Discipline Collaboration to Prevent School Violence,” Dr. Frank Straub of the Police Foundation spoke to a room full of public safety professionals and others responsible for the safety of campuses across the United States. Chief (Ret.) Straub, a 30-year veteran of local and federal law enforcement and survivor of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, has “seen things people aren’t supposed to see” and can relate to the pain of those who have been affected by mass violence.

Straub’s moving keynote address commenced the Campus Safety Conference East,  a 2-day intensive conference and trainings for administrators and public safety officials, technology directors, risk managers, security professionals, and law enforcement executives from all over the country looking for solutions to campus safety, security, emergency management and technology challenges.

At the conference, attendees hear from leading safety and security experts, learn strategies and tactics to reduce risk and improve incident response, learn about best practices and procedures for emergency response, receive actionable items that can be implemented immediately on campus, discover how to be better prepared for emergency situations, and make campuses safer by protecting students and faculty by preventing a crisis before it occurs.

Dr. Straub drew attention to the importance of school officials, law enforcement, policy makers, government leaders, public safety, security, and community members working together to help improve school safety.

“Protecting our nation’s schools and managing and responding to acts of violence is a shared responsibility,” said Straub. “We have to work together and collaborate to find solutions. Our children deserve to learn in safe environments.”

Straub advocated for intervening and providing more mental health services and resources to children who may be at risk of carrying out acts of violence.

Straub also highlighted several initiatives he is leading at the Police Foundation — a national non-profit, independent, non-partisan research organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science — and how these initiatives relate to enhancing safety at schools. These initiatives include the Averted School Violence Database, Center for Mass Violence Response StudiesAfter Action Assessments/Critical Incident Reviews, and a state-by-state legislative review of school facility security policies.

“By working together to improve security measures, I am optimistic we can restore a sense of safety in our schools.”

Frank G. Straub, Ph.D., is Director of Strategic Studies at the Police Foundation, a non-profit organization that studies ways to improve policing in the United States. Dr. Straub, leads the newly established Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, and has directed in-depth studies of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the Kalamazoo mass shooting, and the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting. He is currently leading a review of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.

He is a 30-year veteran of federal and local law enforcement, having served as the police chief in Spokane, Washington; the Public Safety Director in Indianapolis; the Public Safety Commissioner in White Plains, New York; and the New York City Police Department’s Deputy Commissioner of Training and Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism. He also served as a member of the FBI-NYPD Joint Terrorism Task Force during his tenure with the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security and the U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

Dr. Straub is a non-resident fellow at West Point’s Center for Combatting Terrorism providing expert advice regarding the domestic law enforcement response to terrorism and acts of mass public violence.

Police Foundation to Launch Center for Mass Violence Response Studies

In wake of increase in mass violence attacks, Police Foundation creates Center to enhance public safety, government, and community responses

July 9, 2018, WASHINGTON — To further its mission to advance public safety through innovation and science, the Police Foundation — a national, non-partisan, non-profit research organization — is establishing the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies. The mission of the Center is to prepare public safety, government, school, and business and community leaders to think critically about mass violence events, so as to develop and implement comprehensive prevention, response and recovery strategies.

@PoliceFound establishes Center for Mass Violence Response Studies to help prepare leaders to think critically about mass violence events and implement comprehensive prevention, response & recovery strategies. Learn more: policefoundation.org #PFCMVRS

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During the last decade, persons motivated by a range of ideological beliefs and individual factors have engaged in acts of mass violence targeting innocent civilians in communities across the United States. Mass violence attacks, incidents in which multiple persons are killed or injured, have increased in frequency and lethality. While incidents of mass violence, including terrorist events and school shootings, remain relatively infrequent, their effects are devastating for the survivors, families of victims, communities, first responders and the country. For public safety officials, these incidents represent crises that challenge emergency response protocols and demand actionable research to inform policies and practices.

The Center for Mass Violence Response Studies will leverage the Police Foundation’s expertise and its unique position as an independent organization to advise federal, state, and local public safety officials regarding the response to mass violence events. The Center will conduct objective policy-relevant research, critical incident reviews, and provide training and technical assistance to inform strategic thinking, expand knowledge, and advance public safety policies and practices.

“Public safety officials, policy and decision makers, and community leaders learn from research, data, and comprehensive case studies to identify what’s working and what areas can be improved to enhance public safety’s response to mass violence events,” said Chief (Ret.) Jim Bueermann, President of the Police Foundation. “As threats constantly evolve, it is critical that we continuously evaluate protocols to ensure our communities remain as safe as possible.”

The Police Foundation is uniquely positioned to expand on its knowledge and experience in researching, analyzing and educating public safety leaders and the communities they serve regarding the response to mass violence attacks.

The Foundation has conducted critical incident reviews of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, Kalamazoo shootings, and the Pulse Night Club attack. It is currently conducting a comprehensive review of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. In 2015, with funding from the National Institute of Justice and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, the Police Foundation developed and administers the Averted School Violence database. The Police Foundation is also conducting a state by state review of school facility and building safety and security standards and is leading a Countering Violent Extremism project in the Boston area.

Dr. Frank Straub, the Police Foundation’s Director of Strategic Studies, oversees the Foundation’s public safety, terrorism, school safety and youth violence initiatives and will lead the Center for Mass Violence Response Studies.

Established in 1970, the Police Foundation is a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to improving policing through innovation and science. For 48 years, the Foundation has conducted research on all aspects of policing and is leading the way in promoting and sharing evidence-based practices and innovation among law enforcement. The Foundation is currently working with hundreds of police agencies nationwide, as well as internationally, providing research and translation, training, technical assistance, and modern technology implementation. The Foundation is a leader in officer safety and wellness, community policing, open-data, investigations, and law-enforcement technology. The Foundation’s main goal is to improve the way police do their work and the delivery of police services, in order to benefit officers and the communities they serve, as well as reduce crime.

If you would like more information on the Center, please contact Dr. Frank Straub, Director of Strategic Studies, Police Foundation, by email at fstraub@policefoundation.org or by phone at 202-833-1460. You may also visit the Police Foundation main website at www.policefoundation.org.

COMING SOON!
New Police Foundation Reports and Training Opportunities!