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Law Enforcement Leaders Can Learn from Their Rank-and-File

Frank Tona picBy Sergeant Frank P. Tona
Police Foundation Policing Fellow

Across the United States today, police departments are dealing with increased public scrutiny as a number of highly publicized events have impacted the law enforcement profession. I have read the various reports completed by a multitude of think tanks, working groups, and task forces outlining ways the police can build trust in the communities they serve while performing their jobs in a professional and safe manner.

Absent many of these groups are the perspectives and opinions of current rank-and-file police officers. Many of the contributors are distinguished police commanders, chiefs, and sheriffs focused on finding solutions in their communities while effectively managing their organizations.

I believe many of these agencies have rank-and-file officers who have the knowledge, education, and experience to offer different viewpoints on the issues affecting their communities and profession. The officers, many rank-and-file or mid-level supervisors, not only possess the practical aspects of policing, but also have educational and training backgrounds to qualify their opinions. Unfortunately, police departments are not taking advantage of these types of officers who possess these unique skill sets. Read More & Share

Police Data Initiative – Watch the White House Event Here


Screen Shot 2016-04-21 at 12.55.45 PMOn Friday, April 22, 2016, the White House hosted and live streamed an event marking one year of progress on the Police Data Initiative. Launched by the White House as a response to the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, The Police Data Initiative strives to accelerate progress around data transparency and analysis to increase both trust and understanding of law enforcement’s interactions with the public.

PDI mapThe Police Foundation has aided in the Police Data Initiative by creating the Public Safety Open Data Portal. Our portal is intended to serve as a “one-stop-shop” for accessing local and national law enforcement and public safety open datasets. The portal contains select datasets from agencies participating in the White House’s Police Data Initiative as well as national data to provide context. The number of agencies participating in the Initiative is growing rapidly, increasing success and attention nationwide.

As a Police Data Initiative partner, the Police Foundation invites you to view the archived video below to celebrate the advances of the Police Data Initiative and the Public Safety Open Data Portal. Watch White House officials, leading law enforcement agencies, researchers, and community stakeholders as they share experiences, resources, and data innovation leveraged to increase trust between police and citizens. The event includes panel discussions about building community trust and furthering the field with new technologies, and you will hear stories of current Police Data Initiative participants from coast to coast.
 

 

Should you have any questions, please contact us as at info@policefoundation.org.

White House Releases Fact Sheet Highlighting Agencies Committed to the PDI

Today, the White House released a fact sheet recapping one year of the Police Data Initiative. The release comes in conjunction with an event being hosted at the White House today entitled, “The Police Data Initiative Year of Progress: Building on the President’s Call to Action to Leverage Open Data to Increase Trust between Police and Citizens.” To live stream the remainder of the event, please visit www.whitehouse.gov/live.

For more information on how the Police Foundation is contributing to the Police Data Initiative, please visit www.publicsafetydataportal.org.

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New On Policing Release Features Community Engagement Video from Vallejo PD

vallejo PD sealIn the latest release of On Policing, Vallejo, California, Police Department discusses how their department is making an effort to engage and rebuild the relationship with their community in a newly produced YouTube video simply entitled “Reconnecting”.

The video offers insightful perspectives from both community members and police officers, and it underscores the importance of a strong relationship between law enforcement and the communities they serve. To view the video, click here, and be sure to visit www.onpolicing.org next week to check out the next release in the series.

California PD Discusses Relationship with Community in New YouTube Video


vallejo PD seal

By the Vallejo (CA) Police Department
Introduction By Police Foundation
Staff

The Vallejo Police Department has commissioned a promotional video of the California city that it serves and protects. The eight-minute video examines the department’s relationship with the community, both the good and the bad, and addresses the need to reconnect to its roots, hence the name of the video — “Reconnecting” — which can be viewed below and on YouTube.

What’s particularly interesting about this effort is that while VPD paid for the video, it gave complete editorial control of the final product to the local company that recorded, edited and produced it. VPD did not give input or influence to the video. The reason for this was VPD wanted an honest, documentary-styled review of its relationship with the people of Vallejo, which has a population of nearly 120,000. Read More & Share

CSG Justice Center Webinar on Justice & Mental Health Collaboration Program Grant

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On Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at 2:00pm EDT, the CSG Justice Center is hosting a webinar to discuss the Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program (JMHCP) and answer questions about completing proposals, which are due May 17, 2016. The webinar announcement and registration information are available here.

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) is continuing to support the efforts to increase public safety by facilitating collaboration among the criminal justice and mental health and substance abuse treatment systems to increase access to mental health and other treatment services for individuals with mental illnesses or co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders. The JMHCP supports innovative cross-system collaboration for individuals with mental illnesses or co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders who come into contact with the justice system. BJA is seeking applications that demonstrate a collaborative project between criminal justice and mental health partners from eligible applicants to plan, implement, or expand a justice and mental health collaboration program.

Law enforcement agencies that partner with a behavioral health provider to implement or expand specialized state or local law enforcement strategies that are tailored to the needs of people with mental disorders will receive priority consideration for funding.

The full BJA grant announcement and application are available at: https://www.bja.gov/Funding/JMHCP16.pdf. Applications will be accepted through Tuesday, May 17, 2016.

VRN Webinar: Recruiting a Diverse Police Department Through Digital Outreach

The Violence Reduction Network (VRN) is hosting a free webinar, entitled “Recruiting a Diverse Police Department Through Digital Outreach”, on April 21, 2016, from 3:00pm – 4:00pm EDT. This webinar is intended to teach participants about how the Chicago Police Department developed and implemented its 12-week digital outreach campaign to increase minority recruitment, and it will also discuss lessons learned to assist in future recruitment efforts. For more information or a link to register for the event, please click here.

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On Policing Release: Lessons Learned from Stockton, CA

In the latest release of On Policing, Stockton, California, Police Chief Eric Jones discusses the challenges he has encountered and overcome since his appointment in 2012. From leading the department through low morale and tight budgetary constraints amidst city bankruptcy, to handling a high profile bank robbery where police accidentally shot one of the hostages, he recounts the lessons he learned and offers advice on how to navigate similar situations in the future. Also, be sure to catch up on last week’s On Policing release where Chief Paul Walters offers his perspective on how departments can fully integrate SWAT teams into community-based policing. To read the full essays, please visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive regular updates about our On Policing series, please subscribe to our mailing list at the bottom of the page and select to receive information about our “On Policing” series. If you are already a subscriber but are not currently subscribed to receive On Policing updates, just let us know! Feel free to reach us at onpolicing@policefoundation.org with any requests, questions, or new essay submissions.

Lessons Learned from Stockton, CA

Eric Jones photoBy Chief Eric Jones
Stockton, CA, Police Department

Stockton Police Chief Eric Jones knows all about trial by fire. Jones has spent his entire career in the Stockton, CA, department, working his way up the ranks until he became appointed as chief on March 1, 2012, shortly before the city had to file for bankruptcy, which led many of his experienced officers to leave.

Stockton has been considered a crime-heavy city for years, even ranking as Forbes’ eighth most dangerous city in the nation in 2012. And in July 2014, Jones faced one of the hardest, most stressful events any chief has had to face: three armed men stormed a Bank of the West branch, took three hostages, and led police on an hour-long chase, firing more than 100 rounds at the officers with an AK-47 and disabling a dozen police vehicles, including their armored vehicle. The event concluded with a dramatic shootout in which officers fired more than 600 rounds that left one hostage dead, killed by bullets fired by police officers. Jones was lauded for his handling of the traumatic event. None were really surprised because the chief has been praised throughout his tenure for showing how effective true leadership can be. Read More & Share

SWAT Teams can be Front-and-Center in Community-based Policing

paulwalters

By Chief Paul M. Walters (Ret.)
Senior Associate with the Center for Public Safety Management

Before the recent terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, there were a growing number of people questioning the need for the militarization of police. Seeing law enforcement effectively use a military-grade vehicle while utilizing heavy duty weapons to eliminate the terrorist threat seems to have quelled many of those concerns.

But some still question how a full-time, highly trained military type police unit can operate in a community-based police department. Some might argue it seems counter-intuitive at best because the two naturally feel to be at conflict with the other.

I could not disagree more. In reality, a highly trained military type police unit is a critical element in a department’s ability to protect the community they serve. Read More & Share