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Orlando Tragedy Spurs Memories for San Bernardino Police Chief

Burguan_JarrodBy Chief Jarrod Burguan
San Bernardino Police Department

With a very heavy heart, I watched the tragic news unfold out of Orlando this past weekend.

It was painful for me to hear of the unconscionable loss of life. It made me proud to see law enforcement responding forcefully and effectively to prevent more people from being slaughtered.

But it was also an odd situation for me, being on the other side of things. It was just seven months ago that I found myself front and center after my city of San Bernardino fell victim to a terrorist attack from a husband and wife who shot and killed 14 innocent people. Read More & Share

Identifying and Developing Latent Diversity in Policing

Johnson ID photoBy Jeremiah Johnson, Ph.D.
Patrol Sergeant
Darien, CT, Police Department

The present crisis in policing has gathered the winds of reform, generating important conversations about what policing should look like in the 21st century.  A clear consensus is often hard to achieve given the constituencies involved, yet there is almost universal agreement that our profession can begin to turn the ship around through improved hiring practices.  This avenue of reform is typically framed within the context of racial and ethnic diversity, the ideal being that a police agency should reflect the face of the community.  This is indeed an important end that can enhance police legitimacy.  The call to increase the number of women in policing is less pronounced, but no less important.  In fact, increasing female representation is arguably one of the most effective ways to reduce the rate of extralegal force.  We would be remiss, however, to straighten our rudder upon reaching some semblance of diversity on these fronts alone. Read More & Share

LEO Near Miss Featured in May Issue of IACP’s Police Chief Magazine

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As our nation continues to remember and honor the sacrifices of fallen officers following National Police Week, it is critical that we remain focused on reducing and preventing these tragedies.  In this month’s Officer Safety and Wellness issue of the IACP’s Police Chief magazine, Chief Frank Straub (Ret.) and Commissioner Robert Haas explain how law enforcement agencies and officers can take tangible steps towards this goal. Entitled “Learning from Near Misses: The Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss System”, the article calls upon and encourages law enforcement leaders to do more by reporting and learning from near misses that occur within their agencies.

Utilized extensively in other fields such as aviation, medicine, and fire & rescue, the systematic reporting, collection, and analysis of “near miss” incidents is fundamental to reducing risk, improving safety, and saving lives. For every tragedy, there are literally dozens of “near misses”—incidents that could have resulted in significant injury or death if not for a fortunate break in the chain of events. As law enforcement agencies and organizations, such as Below 100, continue to strive towards reducing the number of line of duty deaths, it is critical that agencies look, not only to these tragedies, but also to near misses for lessons learned that can be applied to future operations in order to improve safety.

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LEO Near Miss, developed by the Police Foundation with funding support from the COPS Office, provides law enforcement agencies and officers with the ability to view and report near miss incidents in one online, anonymous, and voluntary system. For more information on the system and the benefits it offers to law enforcement, please see this month’s article in The Police Chief magazine and be sure to visit the LEO Near Miss website at www.LEOnearmiss.org.

 

LEO Near Miss partners

Tracking Data is Key After a State Legalizes Marijuana

CHIEF Marco Vasquez_croppedBy Chief Marco Vasquez
Chief of Police in Erie, Colorado

My home state of Colorado recently released its first study of the consequences of legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

What surprised me the most is how much we still do not know after six years of commercial marijuana legalization. The study examined as much data as could be found. But therein lies the problem: No one had been effectively tracking marijuana statistics prior to 2010 when Colorado legalized the drug to allow for commercial, medical, and then, in 2012, for recreational use.

It’s why I am here to tell you something important: If your state has not legalized marijuana, you can expect that there is a pretty good chance that will change in the future. What I see across the country is that law enforcement leaders are generally in denial that it will happen in their state. And if it does, the reaction is, “Hell no, we are going to resist it at all cost.”

That was the thinking of Colorado law enforcement leading up to the vote. We simply did not think it would happen, and then when it did, the reaction was: Holy cow, what do we do now? Read More & Share

New Release: Law Enforcement Leaders Can Learn from Their Rank-and-File

In this week’s On Policing essay, Police Foundation Policing Fellow, Sgt. Frank Tona, stresses the valuable contributions rank-and-file officers can make to the operations of law enforcement organizations. Many of these officers possess advanced education, training, and practical experience that provide them with unique and innovative perspectives, as well as the skill set to implement evidence-based policing practices. Sgt. Tona calls upon law enforcement leaders to rely not only upon command-level officers for advice and expertise, but also the wealth of knowledge and expertise available among the rank-and-file. Click here to read more.

If you would like to receive regular updates about our On Policing series, please subscribe to our mailing list at the bottom of the page and select to receive information about our “On Policing” series. If you are already a subscriber but are not currently subscribed to receive On Policing updates, just let us know! Feel free to reach us at onpolicing@policefoundation.org with any requests, questions, or new essay submissions.

Law Enforcement Leaders Can Learn from Their Rank-and-File

Frank Tona picBy Sergeant Frank P. Tona
Police Foundation Policing Fellow

Across the United States today, police departments are dealing with increased public scrutiny as a number of highly publicized events have impacted the law enforcement profession. I have read the various reports completed by a multitude of think tanks, working groups, and task forces outlining ways the police can build trust in the communities they serve while performing their jobs in a professional and safe manner.

Absent many of these groups are the perspectives and opinions of current rank-and-file police officers. Many of the contributors are distinguished police commanders, chiefs, and sheriffs focused on finding solutions in their communities while effectively managing their organizations.

I believe many of these agencies have rank-and-file officers who have the knowledge, education, and experience to offer different viewpoints on the issues affecting their communities and profession. The officers, many rank-and-file or mid-level supervisors, not only possess the practical aspects of policing, but also have educational and training backgrounds to qualify their opinions. Unfortunately, police departments are not taking advantage of these types of officers who possess these unique skill sets. Read More & Share

Police Data Initiative – Watch the White House Event Here


Screen Shot 2016-04-21 at 12.55.45 PMOn Friday, April 22, 2016, the White House hosted and live streamed an event marking one year of progress on the Police Data Initiative. Launched by the White House as a response to the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, The Police Data Initiative strives to accelerate progress around data transparency and analysis to increase both trust and understanding of law enforcement’s interactions with the public.

PDI mapThe Police Foundation has aided in the Police Data Initiative by creating the Public Safety Open Data Portal. Our portal is intended to serve as a “one-stop-shop” for accessing local and national law enforcement and public safety open datasets. The portal contains select datasets from agencies participating in the White House’s Police Data Initiative as well as national data to provide context. The number of agencies participating in the Initiative is growing rapidly, increasing success and attention nationwide.

As a Police Data Initiative partner, the Police Foundation invites you to view the archived video below to celebrate the advances of the Police Data Initiative and the Public Safety Open Data Portal. Watch White House officials, leading law enforcement agencies, researchers, and community stakeholders as they share experiences, resources, and data innovation leveraged to increase trust between police and citizens. The event includes panel discussions about building community trust and furthering the field with new technologies, and you will hear stories of current Police Data Initiative participants from coast to coast.
 

 

Should you have any questions, please contact us as at info@policefoundation.org.

White House Releases Fact Sheet Highlighting Agencies Committed to the PDI

Today, the White House released a fact sheet recapping one year of the Police Data Initiative. The release comes in conjunction with an event being hosted at the White House today entitled, “The Police Data Initiative Year of Progress: Building on the President’s Call to Action to Leverage Open Data to Increase Trust between Police and Citizens.” To live stream the remainder of the event, please visit www.whitehouse.gov/live.

For more information on how the Police Foundation is contributing to the Police Data Initiative, please visit www.publicsafetydataportal.org.

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New On Policing Release Features Community Engagement Video from Vallejo PD

vallejo PD sealIn the latest release of On Policing, Vallejo, California, Police Department discusses how their department is making an effort to engage and rebuild the relationship with their community in a newly produced YouTube video simply entitled “Reconnecting”.

The video offers insightful perspectives from both community members and police officers, and it underscores the importance of a strong relationship between law enforcement and the communities they serve. To view the video, click here, and be sure to visit www.onpolicing.org next week to check out the next release in the series.

COMING SOON!
New Police Foundation Reports and Training Opportunities!