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Solving Crime and Enhancing Community-Policing Using Advanced GPS Tracking Technology

lt-martinez-hi-res-picBy Travis Martinez
Special Operations Bureau Lieutenant with the Redlands Police Department

As the crime rate continues to increase throughout California with communities feeling the effects of prison realignment and Prop. 47, law enforcement agencies across the state are challenged with finding new strategies to address community concerns.

Several police agencies – including the Redlands Police Department (RPD) – appear to have found an effective strategy to leverage GPS technology to address crime trends that are popping up in the community. Since 2011, RPD has made 220 arrests for all sorts of robberies and thefts using motion-activated GPS devices that have the capability of being deployed in the field for up to 21 months.

It may seem as if success is measured by the number of arrests, but the reality is most deployments do not result in apprehensions. When it comes to enhancing community policing and promoting police legitimacy, all deployments are critical, even those that ultimately do not result in an arrest.  Read More & Share

Police Foundation Releases New Report Showing Strong Potential for Foot Patrol

Arguably, nothing is more important in policing today than gaining and holding the trust of the community, particularly those most affected by crime and violence. Today, the Police Foundation, with generous support from the Charles Koch Foundation, is releasing a new report that provides real-life examples and optimism for how foot patrol can help law enforcement officers and agencies reconnect and build strong, mutually supportive relationships with their communities.

The report, entitled Engaging Communities One Step at a Time, highlights the positive engaging-communities-one-step-at-a-time_cover-250x310interactions and dialogue that are occurring between communities and foot patrol officers from the Cambridge (MA) Police Department, the New Haven (CT) Police Department, the Evanston (IL) Police Department, the Kalamazoo (MI) Department of Public Safety, and the Portland (OR) Police Bureau. The study found that foot patrol facilitates relationship-building between the police and the community while also enhancing the enforcement and problem-solving efforts of law enforcement.

The importance and timeliness of this study cannot be understated. “Given the recent events in policing and the ongoing national conversation about community-police relations, this study offers a glimpse of the positive policing and engagement occurring across the country”, said Jim Bueermann, president of the Police Foundation. Furthermore, it underscores the importance of relationships. As one community member asserted during the study, “The key to policing, no matter where you are in the country, is building relationships. It’s not rocket science.”

To view and download the full report, please click here.

On Policing: Learning Critical Lessons from 9/11, Then and Today

As our country remembers the lives lost and the selfless sacrifices of so many Americans on September 11, 2001, Dr. Frank Straub recalls his own experience in New York City on img_6045that fateful day. In the newest essay in the On Policing series, Dr. Straub stresses the importance of learning from such incidents as 9/11, the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the Pulse Night Club attack, and other critical incidents in order to prevent future tragedies and loss of life. To read the full essay, please click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

Learning Critical Lessons from 9/11, Then and Today

Frank Straub, Director of Public Safety, waits for his segment of a hearing with members of the Public Safety and Criminal Justice Committee, Indianapolis, Wednesday, April 18, 2012. Robert Scheer/The StarBy Frank Straub
Director of Strategic Studies
Police Foundation

On Saturday (September 10th), I received an email from Jim Bueermann, my boss at the Police Foundation. The email’s subject line was succinct:

“Is that you in this photo from 9/11?”

I opened the email and clicked on the link Jim had provided; I watched the video, and there I was, kneeling next to a NYC fire fighter whom my partner and I had pulled out of the first tower of the World Trade Center after it collapsed. Amazingly, he had survived even though he had been in the lobby.

I had never seen the photo, and it brought back memories of 9/11, which Jim asked me to share. Read More & Share

New Essay: Big Time Trouble Won’t Only Happen in Big Cities

PF On Policing logo final versionThe newest release in the On Policing essay series features Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety Chief Jeffrey Hadley discussing lessons he learned from a series of shootings that occurred in Kalamazoo on February 20, 2016. He emphasizes the critical importance of preparing for critical incidents such as the one experienced by his department, and he stresses the need for an effective communication strategy in the aftermath. To read the full essay, click here or visit www.onpolicing.org.

If you would like to receive updates when new On Policing essays are posted, please click here to subscribe and indicate that you would like to receive information about the On Policing essay series.

Big Time Trouble Won’t Only Happen in Big Cities

jhadley picBy Jeff Hadley
Chief of the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety

If the past year has shown us anything, it’s that crime and terror on a major scale can happen anywhere, not just in big cities like New York or Washington D.C.

There were probably a lot of Americans who had never heard of Kalamazoo, Michigan, before an Uber driver went on a killing spree in my community on Feb. 20, 2016, but I am guessing a lot of Americans also had never heard of San Bernardino, Calif., before terrorists attacked it last December.

Just two weeks before the Uber driver killed six people, I was talking to a reporter and discussing the notion that an active shooter event could easily happen here. As police chiefs, we have to be ready for major incidents, no matter the size of the community that we are responsible for protecting. With major incidents comes major attention from the national media, and these days, sometimes even the international media. Read More & Share

Using Near Repeat Patterns for Community-Driven Crime Prevention

Lead researchers on the Police Foundation’s “Translating ‘Near Repeat’ Theory into a Geospatial Policing Strategy” study have published a new article on Near Repeat Patterns for Community-Driven Crime Prevention. Near repeat Near Repeat coverpatterns have been found for a number of crimes, such as residential burglaries, and can be used to design proactive, community-driven crime prevention strategies. Former Police Foundation Senior Research Associate Dr. Travis Taniguchi of RTI International and Dr. Liz Groff of Temple University published the article in the August 2016 issue of The Police Chief magazine.

To read the full article, please click here.  To read more about the Police Foundation study, please click here.

Police Foundation Receives Public Safety Grant Award from Motorola Solutions Foundation

Motorola and LEO NM logos

The Police Foundation is pleased to announce the award of a Public Safety Grant from the Motorola Solutions Foundation. This grant will continue to advance officer safety by supporting the application of the Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) Near Miss reporting system in law enforcement agencies across the country.

Motorola’s support will allow the Police Foundation to work with key local agency partners in Tempe, Arizona, and Snohomish County, Washington, to implement near miss reporting and analysis at the agency level and train local agency staff regarding the use of the LEO Near Miss system. Additionally, it will enable the Police Foundation and its partner organizations to use near miss incident reports to begin identifying and developing lessons learned to guide operational and tactical decisions and training, which will benefit local partner agencies as well as agencies throughout the U.S.

“The generous support of the Motorola Solutions Foundation will enable us to explore the benefits of near miss reporting and analysis at the agency level in addition to encouraging independent near miss reporting by individual officers.  Ultimately, near miss reporting will benefit individual agencies and the law enforcement profession overall by helping to create a culture of safety” said Jim Bueermann, President of the Police Foundation.

“We wholeheartedly support innovation that enhances public safety,” said Matt Blakely, executive director of the Motorola Solutions Foundation. “The programs we’re supporting will benefit a broad range of communities served by law enforcement officers and staff, fire service personnel, federal agents, emergency medical service providers and our men and women in the military services – both active duty and veterans.”

The foundation gave $3.45 million to 83 organizations in 2016, which will benefit about 1 million first responders and community members.

The Motorola Solutions Foundation serves as an investor and convener on issues that affect the safety of communities around the world, providing leadership in the sector to drive innovation and engage the network of those interested in these issues.

We thank the Motorola Solutions Foundation for their generous support of officer safety. We are proud to partner with Motorola and with the Tempe Police Department, Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office, and many other agencies to improve officer safety.  For more on LEO Near Miss or to submit a report, visit www.LEOnearmiss.org.

New Report Released: State of Policy in Law Enforcement

PowerDMS, in collaboration with the Police Foundation, recently released a new report detailing the current state of policy and training in law enforcement agencies across the State of Policy in LE_cover2country. Drawing from survey responses of over 100 law enforcement leaders, the report provides a baseline of existing practices and a benchmark for best practices in law enforcement policy management and training.

Among the key findings are that well over ninety percent of agencies surveyed:

  • Agreed that policies are very important for law enforcement job performance; and
  • Believe that agency liability, civil lawsuits, and inconsistency are consequences of poor policy management.

The vast majority of law enforcement executives indicated that policies should be “dynamic” or, in other words, be continuously reviewed to ensure agency needs and priorities are being met. Additionally, a majority indicated they currently use a software tool to distribute new policies (63%) or would consider using one in the future (35%). Major sources of data for law enforcement tracking of policy effectiveness include civilian complaints, accreditation standards, and routine internal audits.

StateofPolicygraphic

To compare your policy and training management processes to those of your peers, please download the full report here.

DEA Officer Safety Alert: Fentanyl Can Kill You

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) recently released a 3-minute video warning law enforcement about the danger of exposure to fentanyl, a synthetic opioid about 40 to 50 times stronger than heroin. Commonly sold as heroin, the smallest amounts of fentanyl ingested or absorbed can be lethal, a point emphasized in the video by two New Jersey detectives that were poisoned after accidentally inhaling only a small amount of the drug. To ensure officer and canine safety, the DEA urges law enforcement to take appropriate precautions and forego field testing when dealing with the drug. For more information, please see the DEA roll call video below or visit www.dea.gov.