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Fraud Alert: Calls Soliciting Donations for the “National Police Foundation”

The National Police Foundation, a national, Washington, D.C.-based non-profit organization dedicated to advancing policing through science and innovation, has received information from several individuals who have been contacted by solicitors asking for donations in support of the “National Police Foundation,” or in some cases the “National Police Fund” in which we are not affiliated with.

The Police Foundation does NOT solicit donations from anyone via phone. If you have been contacted via telephone and asked to make donations to the National Police Foundation in Washington, D.C., this is a scam.

Please note that many legitimate local (and unaffiliated) police foundations and organizations may solicit donations from local communities via telephone and mail. If you receive such a call, we encourage you to take note of who is calling (by name and number), the date and time. We also encourage you to require donation information to be sent to you via U.S. Mail before considering any donation.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) maintains an online reporting system for telemarketing and other scams, which can be found at https://www.ftc.gov/faq/consumer-protection/submit-consumer-complaint-ftc and many State Attorneys General offer assistance in reporting and responding to fraud.

The National Police Foundation will closely monitor the information and complaints it receives and will share information with authorities as appropriate.

PRIVACY POLICY AS IT RELATES TO MAKING A DONATION TO THE NATIONAL POLICE FOUNDATION  

Our donations are handled through a third party service provider: Give Lively, LLC, which has its own privacy and security policies.

For more information, please view the National Police Foundation’s Privacy Policy: https://www.policefoundation.org/privacy-policy/

The National Police Foundation was awarded a 2019 GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency — the highest rating for non-profit organizations.    

New Report: Building and Managing a Successful Public Safety UAS Program

The National Police Foundation, in collaboration with the National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, has just released a new report for public safety practitioners interested in using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for public safety operations.

The report, entitled Building and Managing a Successful Public Safety UAS Program: Practical Guidance and Lessons Learned from the Early Adopters, examines seven public safety agencies that were among the very first agencies in the country to deploy UAS. Drawing upon the experience from these early adopting agencies, the report provides practitioners, with or without aviation experience, with practical guidance on the development of a UAS program, including considerations such as community engagement, regulatory compliance, UAS policies and procedures, training, system selection, and data collection. The report also provides a variety of resources that may prove helpful in the management of a UAS program.

 

To view or download a copy of the report, please click here.

New Reports Examine Averted and Completed Acts of School Violence

The National Police Foundation’s Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, in collaboration with the COPS Office, United States Department of Justice, has released two new reports examining both averted and completed acts of school violence.

The first report, entitled A Preliminary Report on the Police Foundation’s Averted School Violence Database, analyzes 51 averted incidents of school violence selected from the Averted School Violence database to begin to improve our understanding of averted school attacks. The report begins with a case study of one averted attack and then details findings on the 51 averted incidents in the study. It concludes with recommendations for law enforcement and school administration to improve school safety. To view and download the report, click here.

As a companion to the first report, the second report, entitled A Comparison of Averted and Completed School Attacks from the Police Foundation Averted School Violence Database, compares and analyzes 51 completed acts of school violence with 51 averted incidents from the ASV database. It includes findings on the demographics of individuals who plan attacks, victims’ demographics in completed attacks, and community characteristics. The report also provides important recommendations to minimize school violence and improve student and school safety. To view and download the report, click here.

The Averted School Violence database was developed to systematically collect and analyze incidents of averted and completed acts of school violence, submitted by school safety practitioners, to identify promising practices in order to grow the body of knowledge related to successful attack prevention. Please help us grow this body of knowledge by submitting all such incidents at avertedschoolviolence.org. The ten minutes you take to report an incident can provide lessons learned that can save lives.

Community Policing and Public Transportation

By Lieutenant Allen Schubert
Los Angeles Police Department

On July 1, 2017, the Los Angeles Police Department’s (LAPD) newly-formed Transit Services Bureau (TSB) and Transit Services Division (TSD) entered into a five-year contract with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (METRO) with the promise to provide safe and effective conveyance for all 1.5 million Angelenos who commute daily along the 95 miles of rail lines and 1,700 bus routes. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has made it very clear that there are no caveats when it states, “all Angelenos.” In the past, several entities have tried to fulfill this commitment, but fell just short of METRO’s expectations. The biggest problem: they were using traditional policing models to handle radio calls. Specifically, calls for service on the rails and buses were just added onto the heavy call load of an already-established division. Officers would respond by patrol vehicle from their normally-patrolled jurisdiction, handle the issue, and quickly dart back to their field duties. This resulted in poor response times and a disconnect between the rail/bus commuters and officers. In addition, officers never gained a fundamental working knowledge of the quality-of-life issues plaguing the transportation riders. Read More & Share

Police Foundation Grieves Passing of Executive Fellow Tom Engells

The Police Foundation grieves the sudden passing of PF Executive Fellow and UTMB Police Chief Tom Engells this past Sunday. Please see below for a message about Chief Engells from UTMB’s President, Dr. David Callender:

“Chief Engells has led our Police Department since 2010, and has been part of the UT System family for more than 34 years. Under his dynamic leadership, UTMB became the first UT System police department to achieve national accreditation for excellence from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). He was named the inaugural UT System Police Chief of the Year in 2011 and again in 2014, and also earned “Law Enforcement Administrator of the Year” by the Texas Association of College and University Police Administrators. More recently, Chief Engells achieved international recognition for his expertise in biosecurity.

He was also a proud veteran of the United States Marine Corps. His accomplishments and contributions to UTMB, UT System and the policing profession were many. Most of all, Tom was our brilliant and witty colleague whose humble, soft-spoken nature had a powerful impact on all who knew him. We will surely miss him.

Please keep Tom’s wife, Peggy, and his daughter, Laura, in your thoughts during this most difficult time.”
 
Tom was always fun, insightful, and a pleasure to work with. He will be greatly missed at the Police Foundation.

A Message from Police Foundation President Jim Bueermann

Dear Friends,

As you and others involved in policing know very well, the role of our nation’s finest and the job these men and women courageously do every day comes with great cost. At times, this work is misunderstood. Yet we continue to have faith and confidence in America’s most noble profession – policing.

As we witness and participate in conversations about law enforcement issues, it becomes very evident that it is far too difficult to find independent, nonpartisan research and resources that can help improve our collective understanding and can help us separate fact from fiction. Objective, unbiased research and resources for executives, command staff, and the rank and file, as well as our political and community stakeholders, is exactly what we – collectively – need.

The Police Foundation is the oldest nationally known, nonprofit, non-partisan, and non-membership-guided organization dedicated to improving policing in America. We are unique in our independence, our work, and our people, and we leverage this uniqueness as we support the advancement of policing through innovation and science. Throughout our history, we have always insisted that our work have a practical impact on policing and that the knowledge gained through empirical investigation be applicable outside the “laboratory,” informing police work.

Looking ahead, we need to better understand how the national conversations are impacting police organizations, leaders, and those on the front lines. We need to dig deeper into sometimes difficult or daunting issues such as effectively policing peaceful and non-peaceful mass demonstrations, preventing and effectively responding to incidents of mass violence, and understanding how these issues impact the officers and their families, as well as the communities that they serve and that they too are a part of. Topics such as officer safety and violent crime are at the top of our agenda in 2018, as is exploring the role of cutting edge technologies such as virtual and augmented reality and artificial intelligence in policing. We will continue to address these areas through our unique combination of science and research with practical experience and innovation, all with the goal of translating critical research findings into practical guidance for executives and officers on the street alike.

As President of the Police Foundation, I ask you to consider supporting our work, to help us identify policing best practices and share those best practices with others.


On #GivingTuesday, support effective American policing by supporting the Police Foundation. To make a donation, please click here or click the Donate button above. The Police Foundation is an exempt organization under IRC section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible to the full extent of the law and will help us continue our critical work.

Any level of support is appreciated. Even if you are not in a position to donate, I hope you will join me in sharing the news about our mission, our work, and our commitment.

Thank you, and be safe.

Sincerely,

Jim Bueermann

Calibre Press Urges Law Enforcement to Learn from the Past to Prevent Future Tragedies

A few days ago, Calibre Press released a new article, entitled “What Nearly Happened,” issuing a call to law enforcement to begin learning from its close calls and good-faith mistakes to prevent future tragedies. In the article, Calibre Press Publisher Crawford Coates points to the success of FireFighterNearMiss.com in promoting a culture of safety within the fire and EMS service and highlights the Police Foundation’s LEO Near Miss reporting system as a way to foster a similar culture in law enforcement. To read the full article from Calibre Press, please click here.

We thank Calibre Press for their dedication to officer safety and for their support in this important initiative.

Register Now! “Opiate Crisis: Professional and Personal Experiences”

​On September 28, 2017, the Police Institute at Rutgers University is excited to welcome Colonel Joseph R. Fuentes, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, and Shelly Lowe, Program Development Specialist for the New Jersey State Police, as our next Distinguished Lecturers. Colonel Fuentes and Ms. Lowe will lead a discussion titled “Opiate Crisis: Professional and Personal Experiences”.

This Distinguished Lecture Series event will speak to and answer questions about the opiate crisis in New Jersey with a focus on heroin. Colonel Fuentes will provide information on the role of the New Jersey State Police in this war on opioids, the path of heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF), and its impact on communities and law enforcement. Shelly Lowe will provide her personal perspective on “it’s not just a disease.” Shelly Lowe was born and raised in Lakehurst, New Jersey. She and her husband Adam raised three children: Adam Jr. (27), Amber (24) and Austin (22). Adam Jr.’s life ended November 28, 2016 by snorting heroin laced with fentanyl.

If you would like to register to attend this event, please refer to the event flyer by clicking here or clicking on the flyer to the right.

Police Foundation Releases New Issue of Ideas in American Policing

Yesterday, the Police Foundation released the newest issue of its flagship seminar and publication series, Ideas in American Policing, entitled “Outside the Academy: Learning Community Policing through Community Engagement.” In it, Anne Li Kringen, Ph.D. and Jonathan Allen Kringen, Ph.D. beg the question, “Can new recruits really learn community policing inside the training academy? Using New Haven Police Department’s innovative approach to training recruits in community policing through community engagement outside the academy as an example, this publication explores the impact of this innovative approach on the involved recruits, the potential value of context-based learning, and the benefits of formative community experiences for police recruits.

We encourage you to view and download the publication here, and if you missed the presentation, we’ll be posting a video of the lecture and discussion on our website in the next few weeks. If you would like to read other issues in the Ideas in American Policing series, written by esteemed authors such as Dr. Lawrence Sherman and Dr. David Weisburd, please visit our Ideas in American Policing Library.

New Infographic Released on the Use of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) by Law Enforcement

Ensuring the safety of the public is a core mission for all professional law enforcement agencies. In pursuit of this mission, law enforcement leverages many different types of tools, including new and emerging technologies. One of these latest technologies is the small-unmanned aircraft system (sUAS).

Today, the Police Foundation released a new infographic for both law enforcement agencies considering the use of small unmanned aircraft systems for public safety sUAS Infographic thumbnail_157x105purposes and for communities interested in learning more about the purposes and protections surrounding their use. The infographic, entitled sUAS and Public Safety, provides an overview of operational, training, and legal and regulatory compliance considerations in visual format for law enforcement agencies interested in using sUAS for public safety. Importantly, it highlights key recommendations for law enforcement agencies on engaging their communities in the co-production of public safety using sUAS prior to implementation.

Check out our new infographic here, and follow the links below to view our other resources on the use of sUAS in law enforcement:

COMING SOON!
New Police Foundation Reports and Training Opportunities!